The Effect of Depression on Immune Function and Health Outcomes in Women

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149175
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Effect of Depression on Immune Function and Health Outcomes in Women
Abstract:
The Effect of Depression on Immune Function and Health Outcomes in Women
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Howk, Cherie
P.I. Institution Name:Indiana State University
This research investigates the effect of depression on immune function and health outcomes in a sample of non-hospitalized women. A comparison was made between women with depression and those without depression on variables of immune function and health. Women with depression were those who scored in the mild, moderate or severe category on the Beck Depression Inventory. Immune function was measured as natural killer (NK) cell activity and white blood cell (WBC) count with differential. Health was measured using a self-report questionnaire and a standardized physical examination. Using psychoneuroimmunology theory and a descriptive design, 40 non-hospitalized Caucasian women between the ages of 18 and 65 years participated, 23 in the depressed group and 17 in the control group. Women with depression were found to report significantly more incidences of illness over the previous two months and they were found to have significantly more indicators of illness at the time of exam as compared to the controls. However, contrary to what has been documented in studies of hospitalized males, women with depression were not found to have significantly different immune function measures as compared to the control group. And, there was no significant correlation found between scores on the BDI and natural killer cell cytotoxicity within the participants as a whole. These findings support a connection between depression and both increased self-report of illness and increased signs and symptoms of minor illness. However, this study was not able to document that these effects were related to the immune function measures used in this study, natural killer cell activity or white blood cell counts. The possibility of other aspects of the immune system producing this effect was not ruled out.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Effect of Depression on Immune Function and Health Outcomes in Womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149175-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Effect of Depression on Immune Function and Health Outcomes in Women</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Howk, Cherie</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Indiana State University</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">c-howk@indstate.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">This research investigates the effect of depression on immune function and health outcomes in a sample of non-hospitalized women. A comparison was made between women with depression and those without depression on variables of immune function and health. Women with depression were those who scored in the mild, moderate or severe category on the Beck Depression Inventory. Immune function was measured as natural killer (NK) cell activity and white blood cell (WBC) count with differential. Health was measured using a self-report questionnaire and a standardized physical examination. Using psychoneuroimmunology theory and a descriptive design, 40 non-hospitalized Caucasian women between the ages of 18 and 65 years participated, 23 in the depressed group and 17 in the control group. Women with depression were found to report significantly more incidences of illness over the previous two months and they were found to have significantly more indicators of illness at the time of exam as compared to the controls. However, contrary to what has been documented in studies of hospitalized males, women with depression were not found to have significantly different immune function measures as compared to the control group. And, there was no significant correlation found between scores on the BDI and natural killer cell cytotoxicity within the participants as a whole. These findings support a connection between depression and both increased self-report of illness and increased signs and symptoms of minor illness. However, this study was not able to document that these effects were related to the immune function measures used in this study, natural killer cell activity or white blood cell counts. The possibility of other aspects of the immune system producing this effect was not ruled out.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:57:29Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:57:29Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.