2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149177
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effects of Crossing Legs on Blood Pressure Measurement
Abstract:
Effects of Crossing Legs on Blood Pressure Measurement
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Keele-Smith, Rebecca
P.I. Institution Name:New Mexico State University
Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine if blood pressure measurement is affected by the leg crossed at the knee as compared with feet flat on the floor in a well senior population. Results of limited research indicate that both systolic and diastolic blood pressure increased significantly with the crossed leg position (Fitzpatrick, Ortiz, Sibilano, Marcantonio & Brown, 1999; Peters, Binder, & Campbell, 1999). Design: A repeated measures cross-over design was used with the independent variable being the crossing of one leg. The dependent variable was the blood pressure measurement before and after one leg is crossed. Sample: One hundred and three senior citizens (50-92 years old) participated in the study. Fifty-two subjects were female and 51 were male. Sixty subjects were Non-Hispanic White (58.3%); 28 (27.2%) were Hispanic; and two (12.6%) were Black American. The majority of the subjects (54.4%) rated their health status as good. There were 49 subjects currently being treated for hypertension. Setting: Two local senior citizen centers were used as the setting for this study. Names of Variables: It was hypothesized that subject’s blood pressure measurements would be higher with legs crossed than with legs uncrossed. Measures/Instruments: Blood pressure measurements were performed and recorded by six registered nurses in a graduate nursing research class at a local university. A written protocol for taking blood pressure was adapted from the American Heart Association and the National Heart Foundation (JNC VI, 1997; Anderson & Maloney, 1994). Subjects were randomly assigned to one of two protocols. One protocol had subjects sitting with feet flat on the floor for three minutes. Blood pressure was then measured. Subjects were then asked to cross one leg over the knee for three minutes. Blood pressure measurement was then repeated. The other protocol was just the reverse of the one described here. Findings: Results indicate that blood pressure was significantly higher when legs were crossed versus uncrossed. Conclusions: According to the findings of this study, blood pressure readings may be artificially high if measured while an individual has a leg crossed at the knee. Even though systolic pressure changed by 5.9 mmHg and diastolic pressure changed by only 2.97, if a person’s blood pressure is already on the high end of normal, even this small amount could impact their clinical treatment. Implications: Findings can be immediately applied to all clinical settings where blood pressure measurement is a common function. Instructing patients to keep their feet flat on the floor should be an important part of this procedure. Schools of Nursing should incorporate these findings into Fundamentals Courses where basic skills such as blood pressure measurement are taught.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEffects of Crossing Legs on Blood Pressure Measurementen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149177-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Effects of Crossing Legs on Blood Pressure Measurement</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Keele-Smith, Rebecca</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">New Mexico State University</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">bkeele@nmsu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine if blood pressure measurement is affected by the leg crossed at the knee as compared with feet flat on the floor in a well senior population. Results of limited research indicate that both systolic and diastolic blood pressure increased significantly with the crossed leg position (Fitzpatrick, Ortiz, Sibilano, Marcantonio &amp; Brown, 1999; Peters, Binder, &amp; Campbell, 1999). Design: A repeated measures cross-over design was used with the independent variable being the crossing of one leg. The dependent variable was the blood pressure measurement before and after one leg is crossed. Sample: One hundred and three senior citizens (50-92 years old) participated in the study. Fifty-two subjects were female and 51 were male. Sixty subjects were Non-Hispanic White (58.3%); 28 (27.2%) were Hispanic; and two (12.6%) were Black American. The majority of the subjects (54.4%) rated their health status as good. There were 49 subjects currently being treated for hypertension. Setting: Two local senior citizen centers were used as the setting for this study. Names of Variables: It was hypothesized that subject&rsquo;s blood pressure measurements would be higher with legs crossed than with legs uncrossed. Measures/Instruments: Blood pressure measurements were performed and recorded by six registered nurses in a graduate nursing research class at a local university. A written protocol for taking blood pressure was adapted from the American Heart Association and the National Heart Foundation (JNC VI, 1997; Anderson &amp; Maloney, 1994). Subjects were randomly assigned to one of two protocols. One protocol had subjects sitting with feet flat on the floor for three minutes. Blood pressure was then measured. Subjects were then asked to cross one leg over the knee for three minutes. Blood pressure measurement was then repeated. The other protocol was just the reverse of the one described here. Findings: Results indicate that blood pressure was significantly higher when legs were crossed versus uncrossed. Conclusions: According to the findings of this study, blood pressure readings may be artificially high if measured while an individual has a leg crossed at the knee. Even though systolic pressure changed by 5.9 mmHg and diastolic pressure changed by only 2.97, if a person&rsquo;s blood pressure is already on the high end of normal, even this small amount could impact their clinical treatment. Implications: Findings can be immediately applied to all clinical settings where blood pressure measurement is a common function. Instructing patients to keep their feet flat on the floor should be an important part of this procedure. Schools of Nursing should incorporate these findings into Fundamentals Courses where basic skills such as blood pressure measurement are taught.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:57:31Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:57:31Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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