2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149179
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Improving Clinical Outcomes in Heart Failure
Abstract:
Improving Clinical Outcomes in Heart Failure
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Elliott, Kathleen
P.I. Institution Name:University of Massachusetts-Dartmouth
Objective: Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in the United States today and one of the most prevalent chronic illnesses in adults. The American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association report states that 4.7 million Americans have heart failure. The cost of treating this illness is estimated at nearly 9 billon dollars per year. In an effort to control costs, clients are being discharged from the hospital sooner. Therefore, nurses have less time to provide adequate education in all aspects of heart failure management. The purpose of this study was to determine if a tailored educational intervention done at 3 points over a 1-month time period, will decrease costly hospital readmissions. Design: Randomized clinical trial. Sample: Seventy-two subjects with a primary diagnosis of heart failure, a mean age of 75+ 11 years, an educational level of 11+ 2 years, NYHA (New York Heart Association) stage of 2.7+ 4.0+ 2.1. comorbidities were recruited for the study. Setting: A 214 bed Southeastern Massachusetts community hospital. Variables: Independent variables included gender, age, EF, educational level, comorbidities, and marital status. The dependent variable was number of hospital readmissions. Measures/Instruments: The Health Belief Model was the guiding framework for the study. Bennett’s Health Belief Scales, based on The Health Belief Model, determined the client’s knowledge level of and barriers to disease management compliance. Tailored instruction was provided during initial hospitalization, 1 week, and 1 month after discharge in the client’s home using the same format each time. Education focused on client-identified barriers to heart failure management. Quality of life scores were obtained on all participants during the initial interview using the Minnesota Living with Heart Failure Questionnaire (MHLF). Chart reviews were done on all members of the control group in order to collect demographic information and level of disease severity, for comparison with the experimental group. Additionally, data on readmission rates in the experimental group were collected and compared with the control group. Findings: Chi square analysis revealed no significant differences in age, educational level, experimental and control groups. A Kruskal-Wallis was done with significant (p<.05) differences in readmission rates between the experimental and control groups. The control group had higher readmission rates. Conclusions/Implications: these findings add to the body of research promoting the importance of tailored education in preventing costly hospital readmissions, and suggest a need to increase home nursing visits.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImproving Clinical Outcomes in Heart Failureen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149179-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Improving Clinical Outcomes in Heart Failure</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Elliott, Kathleen</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Massachusetts-Dartmouth</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in the United States today and one of the most prevalent chronic illnesses in adults. The American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association report states that 4.7 million Americans have heart failure. The cost of treating this illness is estimated at nearly 9 billon dollars per year. In an effort to control costs, clients are being discharged from the hospital sooner. Therefore, nurses have less time to provide adequate education in all aspects of heart failure management. The purpose of this study was to determine if a tailored educational intervention done at 3 points over a 1-month time period, will decrease costly hospital readmissions. Design: Randomized clinical trial. Sample: Seventy-two subjects with a primary diagnosis of heart failure, a mean age of 75+ 11 years, an educational level of 11+ 2 years, NYHA (New York Heart Association) stage of 2.7+ 4.0+ 2.1. comorbidities were recruited for the study. Setting: A 214 bed Southeastern Massachusetts community hospital. Variables: Independent variables included gender, age, EF, educational level, comorbidities, and marital status. The dependent variable was number of hospital readmissions. Measures/Instruments: The Health Belief Model was the guiding framework for the study. Bennett&rsquo;s Health Belief Scales, based on The Health Belief Model, determined the client&rsquo;s knowledge level of and barriers to disease management compliance. Tailored instruction was provided during initial hospitalization, 1 week, and 1 month after discharge in the client&rsquo;s home using the same format each time. Education focused on client-identified barriers to heart failure management. Quality of life scores were obtained on all participants during the initial interview using the Minnesota Living with Heart Failure Questionnaire (MHLF). Chart reviews were done on all members of the control group in order to collect demographic information and level of disease severity, for comparison with the experimental group. Additionally, data on readmission rates in the experimental group were collected and compared with the control group. Findings: Chi square analysis revealed no significant differences in age, educational level, experimental and control groups. A Kruskal-Wallis was done with significant (p&lt;.05) differences in readmission rates between the experimental and control groups. The control group had higher readmission rates. Conclusions/Implications: these findings add to the body of research promoting the importance of tailored education in preventing costly hospital readmissions, and suggest a need to increase home nursing visits.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:57:33Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:57:33Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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