2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149183
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Leader's Role in Creating a Healthy Environment of Care
Abstract:
The Leader's Role in Creating a Healthy Environment of Care
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Disch, Joanne, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Minnesota
Title:Director of Nursing
Creating healing environments for patients and families is a fundamental responsibility of nurses. Yet nursing leaders – whether manager, charge nurse, or executive – are also responsible for creating environments in which caregivers can feel competent, respected, and safe. This has become an increasingly difficult aspect of the leader’s role. First, the shortened length of stay, financial pressures and competition in the work setting create stressful and adversarial conditions. Second, the increasingly part-time nature of nursing practice, whether by staff nurse choice, or the use of float nurses and agency nurses, compromises continuity of care for patients and the development of effective work teams for nurses and other caregivers. Third, nursing leaders must reconcile the inherent paradoxes of health care: do more with less, improve quality and reduce cost, be competitive and collegial, promote nursing and interdisciplinary collaboration. Fourth, the incidence of abuse and violence in the health care setting is beginning to parallel that in other industries. The purpose of this session is to equip nursing leaders with an understanding of the issues related to violence and abuse in health care settings; to offer a framework for examining these issues; and to develop strategies not only for reducing abuse and violence, but also creating environments of care within which patients and families receive compassionate care, and employees want to work. Through a combination of lecture, group discussion and personal reflection, the participants will gain skills in establishing effective partnerships, and creating healing environments that support patients, families, staff and themselves.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Leader's Role in Creating a Healthy Environment of Careen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149183-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Leader's Role in Creating a Healthy Environment of Care</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Disch, Joanne, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Minnesota</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Director of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">disch003@umn.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Creating healing environments for patients and families is a fundamental responsibility of nurses. Yet nursing leaders &ndash; whether manager, charge nurse, or executive &ndash; are also responsible for creating environments in which caregivers can feel competent, respected, and safe. This has become an increasingly difficult aspect of the leader&rsquo;s role. First, the shortened length of stay, financial pressures and competition in the work setting create stressful and adversarial conditions. Second, the increasingly part-time nature of nursing practice, whether by staff nurse choice, or the use of float nurses and agency nurses, compromises continuity of care for patients and the development of effective work teams for nurses and other caregivers. Third, nursing leaders must reconcile the inherent paradoxes of health care: do more with less, improve quality and reduce cost, be competitive and collegial, promote nursing and interdisciplinary collaboration. Fourth, the incidence of abuse and violence in the health care setting is beginning to parallel that in other industries. The purpose of this session is to equip nursing leaders with an understanding of the issues related to violence and abuse in health care settings; to offer a framework for examining these issues; and to develop strategies not only for reducing abuse and violence, but also creating environments of care within which patients and families receive compassionate care, and employees want to work. Through a combination of lecture, group discussion and personal reflection, the participants will gain skills in establishing effective partnerships, and creating healing environments that support patients, families, staff and themselves.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:57:37Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:57:37Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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