North Dakota Nursing Report Card: Benchmarking Indicators of Nurse and Patient Satisfaction in Acute and Long-Term Care Settings

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149189
Type:
Presentation
Title:
North Dakota Nursing Report Card: Benchmarking Indicators of Nurse and Patient Satisfaction in Acute and Long-Term Care Settings
Abstract:
North Dakota Nursing Report Card: Benchmarking Indicators of Nurse and Patient Satisfaction in Acute and Long-Term Care Settings
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Author:Anderson, Julie, RN, PhD, CCRC
P.I. Institution Name:University of North Dakota
Title:Assistant Professor
Co-Authors:Diane Langemo, RN, PhD; Cecelia Volden, RN, MSN, MSED
Over the past two decades major cost control pressures, the re-structuring and re-engineering initiatives, and the managed care movement have all impacted the delivery of patient care. To address these concerns, the American Nurses Association (ANA) commissioned the nursing care quality outcomes study. The Nursing Report Card (NRC) Study was designed to be a multi-state, three part consecutive process to include a feasibility study, a pilot study, and a yearlong study of agency and individual unit information. North Dakota (ND) participated in the entire NRC study and was the only state to invite long-term care (LTC) facilities to participate. In addition, ND remains the only state currently requiring a baccalaureate degree for entry into professional nursing practice and is noted to not have a current or projected nurse shortage until 2010. These factors placed ND in a unique position to explore impetuses that inspire as well as dishearten nursing professionals and the impact of education on patient/resident outcomes. The NRC Study addressed nurse and patient satisfaction as two components of an in-depth benchmarking analysis of the role nurses play in ensuring quality patient care. Patient satisfaction in acute care was measured via the Patient Opinions of Nursing Care survey; a 42-item form derived by the Texas Nurses' Association. Resident satisfaction was measured using the American Health Care Association Theme Satisfaction Survey. Nurse satisfaction was measured using the Index of Work Satisfaction. Acute care patients were significantly more satisfied with nursing care than with the overall hospitalization; in LTC, cognitively intact residents were most satisfied with feeling the environment was secure while family of mild dementia residents were most satisfied with the help given in adapting to placing their family member in the nursing home; a supervisor supportive of nurses most important to satisfaction for nurses from both settings.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNorth Dakota Nursing Report Card: Benchmarking Indicators of Nurse and Patient Satisfaction in Acute and Long-Term Care Settingsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149189-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">North Dakota Nursing Report Card: Benchmarking Indicators of Nurse and Patient Satisfaction in Acute and Long-Term Care Settings</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Anderson, Julie, RN, PhD, CCRC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of North Dakota</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">julie_anderson@mail.und.nodak.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Diane Langemo, RN, PhD; Cecelia Volden, RN, MSN, MSED</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Over the past two decades major cost control pressures, the re-structuring and re-engineering initiatives, and the managed care movement have all impacted the delivery of patient care. To address these concerns, the American Nurses Association (ANA) commissioned the nursing care quality outcomes study. The Nursing Report Card (NRC) Study was designed to be a multi-state, three part consecutive process to include a feasibility study, a pilot study, and a yearlong study of agency and individual unit information. North Dakota (ND) participated in the entire NRC study and was the only state to invite long-term care (LTC) facilities to participate. In addition, ND remains the only state currently requiring a baccalaureate degree for entry into professional nursing practice and is noted to not have a current or projected nurse shortage until 2010. These factors placed ND in a unique position to explore impetuses that inspire as well as dishearten nursing professionals and the impact of education on patient/resident outcomes. The NRC Study addressed nurse and patient satisfaction as two components of an in-depth benchmarking analysis of the role nurses play in ensuring quality patient care. Patient satisfaction in acute care was measured via the Patient Opinions of Nursing Care survey; a 42-item form derived by the Texas Nurses' Association. Resident satisfaction was measured using the American Health Care Association Theme Satisfaction Survey. Nurse satisfaction was measured using the Index of Work Satisfaction. Acute care patients were significantly more satisfied with nursing care than with the overall hospitalization; in LTC, cognitively intact residents were most satisfied with feeling the environment was secure while family of mild dementia residents were most satisfied with the help given in adapting to placing their family member in the nursing home; a supervisor supportive of nurses most important to satisfaction for nurses from both settings.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:57:43Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:57:43Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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