2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149190
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nurses as Multiple Role Women in Distance Education
Abstract:
Nurses as Multiple Role Women in Distance Education
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Author:Andrusyszyn, Dr. Mary-Anne, RN, MScN, EdD
P.I. Institution Name:The University of Western Ontario
Title:Associate Professor
Co-Authors:Dr. Catherine E. (Betty) Cragg, RN, MEd, EdD
Objectives: 1. Evaluate advantages and challenges of distance education for nurses as multiple role women; 2. Compare perceptions of nurses with those of women taking other distance professional programs. Design: Phase 1: Interviews conducted with women in distance education programs offered synchronously and asynchronously. Qualitative analysis revealed the impact of distance education studies on women’s lives and their perceived preferences and difficulties. Phase 2: A survey, based on the literature and phase one, was administered to women enrolled in distance education professional programs. Population, sample, setting: Phase 1: 76% (n=19) were nurses. Phase 2: Survey completed by 573 students in nursing, general accounting, health studies, education, and business administration. Eighty-one participants (14%) were in nursing programs. Concept or variables studied together: Multiple role women, professional women, advantages and challenges of being a distance student. Methods: Phase 1: Semi-structured, taped, telephone interviews with women in professional distance education programs conducted. Descriptive content analysis generated themes. Phase 2: Online and mail surveys of women in distance education professional programs. Quantitative analysis included descriptive statistics, comparisons of synchronous and asynchronous groups, different professional programs, and life circumstances. Findings: Women held a mean of 6 roles in addition to distance education student; Instructor and family supports were important to all participants; Satisfaction was positively correlated with control over learning circumstances; A number of stress symptoms reported, but 80% responded that they were in good health; Nurses’ responses were not significantly different from those of other women. Conclusions: Distance education gives nurses opportunities to pursue professional education, however they experience personal costs to family life, social relationships, and health. Implications: Nursing educators using distance education should consider the needs of multiple role women, and recognize the importance of program support. Family support is critical for success in distance education.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNurses as Multiple Role Women in Distance Educationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149190-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Nurses as Multiple Role Women in Distance Education</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Andrusyszyn, Dr. Mary-Anne, RN, MScN, EdD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">The University of Western Ontario</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">maandrus@uwo.ca</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Dr. Catherine E. (Betty) Cragg, RN, MEd, EdD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objectives: 1. Evaluate advantages and challenges of distance education for nurses as multiple role women; 2. Compare perceptions of nurses with those of women taking other distance professional programs. Design: Phase 1: Interviews conducted with women in distance education programs offered synchronously and asynchronously. Qualitative analysis revealed the impact of distance education studies on women&rsquo;s lives and their perceived preferences and difficulties. Phase 2: A survey, based on the literature and phase one, was administered to women enrolled in distance education professional programs. Population, sample, setting: Phase 1: 76% (n=19) were nurses. Phase 2: Survey completed by 573 students in nursing, general accounting, health studies, education, and business administration. Eighty-one participants (14%) were in nursing programs. Concept or variables studied together: Multiple role women, professional women, advantages and challenges of being a distance student. Methods: Phase 1: Semi-structured, taped, telephone interviews with women in professional distance education programs conducted. Descriptive content analysis generated themes. Phase 2: Online and mail surveys of women in distance education professional programs. Quantitative analysis included descriptive statistics, comparisons of synchronous and asynchronous groups, different professional programs, and life circumstances. Findings: Women held a mean of 6 roles in addition to distance education student; Instructor and family supports were important to all participants; Satisfaction was positively correlated with control over learning circumstances; A number of stress symptoms reported, but 80% responded that they were in good health; Nurses&rsquo; responses were not significantly different from those of other women. Conclusions: Distance education gives nurses opportunities to pursue professional education, however they experience personal costs to family life, social relationships, and health. Implications: Nursing educators using distance education should consider the needs of multiple role women, and recognize the importance of program support. Family support is critical for success in distance education.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:57:45Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:57:45Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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