2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149202
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Preceptors: Do They Really Make A Difference?
Abstract:
Preceptors: Do They Really Make A Difference?
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Author:Borillo, Rod A., PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Detroit Mercy
Title:Assistant Professor
Training new employees is time consuming and costly. When training does not produce knowledge retention, changes in attitude, and changes in on-the-job performance, much of the investment is wasted. When there has been no skill transfer, the trainer and the employee as well as the organization is at a loss. In an era of cost containment, health care organizations are finding ways to train and develop their employees at the lowest possible cost without compromising the delivery of high-quality service. For hospitals to be competitive, a highly skilled workforce is warranted. For this reason, training professionals are looking at the transfer strategies on how to reinforce and maintain skills on the job that were learned from the training program. Feedback is one of the most cost-effective ways that impacts employee performance. This study examined the effects of the timing of feedback and learner characteristics (age, gender, grade point average, educational background, work experiences) on the end-of-training performance using a conceptual model from the Transfer of Training Model (Baldwin & Ford, 1988) and Systemic Training Design Model (Richey, 1992). Participants were graduate nurses who were randomly assigned to two treatments (immediate vs. delayed feedback). Data were analyzed using t-test. Pearson correlation coefficient, and Analysis of Variance (ANOVA). The findings state that immediate and timely feedback positively affects the end-of-training performance. In a training situation where feedback is non-existent or delayed, other learner characteristics (maturity and previous academic background) influence task performance. The use of feedback as a tool to improve performance can also be an organizational resource to help maintain the skills learned from training for easy transfer to the workplace. In summary, feedback is one of the many resources a preceptor can use to maximize positive training outcomes as well as skill transfer.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePreceptors: Do They Really Make A Difference?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149202-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Preceptors: Do They Really Make A Difference?</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Borillo, Rod A., PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Detroit Mercy</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">rborillo@yahoo.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Training new employees is time consuming and costly. When training does not produce knowledge retention, changes in attitude, and changes in on-the-job performance, much of the investment is wasted. When there has been no skill transfer, the trainer and the employee as well as the organization is at a loss. In an era of cost containment, health care organizations are finding ways to train and develop their employees at the lowest possible cost without compromising the delivery of high-quality service. For hospitals to be competitive, a highly skilled workforce is warranted. For this reason, training professionals are looking at the transfer strategies on how to reinforce and maintain skills on the job that were learned from the training program. Feedback is one of the most cost-effective ways that impacts employee performance. This study examined the effects of the timing of feedback and learner characteristics (age, gender, grade point average, educational background, work experiences) on the end-of-training performance using a conceptual model from the Transfer of Training Model (Baldwin &amp; Ford, 1988) and Systemic Training Design Model (Richey, 1992). Participants were graduate nurses who were randomly assigned to two treatments (immediate vs. delayed feedback). Data were analyzed using t-test. Pearson correlation coefficient, and Analysis of Variance (ANOVA). The findings state that immediate and timely feedback positively affects the end-of-training performance. In a training situation where feedback is non-existent or delayed, other learner characteristics (maturity and previous academic background) influence task performance. The use of feedback as a tool to improve performance can also be an organizational resource to help maintain the skills learned from training for easy transfer to the workplace. In summary, feedback is one of the many resources a preceptor can use to maximize positive training outcomes as well as skill transfer.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:57:57Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:57:57Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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