Designated Education Units: Linking Academia with Practice and Administration

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149216
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Designated Education Units: Linking Academia with Practice and Administration
Abstract:
Designated Education Units: Linking Academia with Practice and Administration
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Author:Carr, MaryAnn, DNSc, RN, CS
P.I. Institution Name:Pacific Lutheran University
Title:Clinical Assistant Professor
Background: Dissatisfaction by clinical nurses, academia, and management lead to discussions for a different approach to education. The concept of the Designated Education Units (DEU) was developed from Flinders University of South Australia (Edgecombe, Wotten, Gonda, and Mason, 1999). This abstract highlights initial outcomes from a northwest baccalaureate school's collaborative project with two Medical-Surgical sites after one semester. Junior/Senior students plus RNs gave anonymous written feedback collected at the end of previous clinicals about students' experiences and RN-student mentorship. Future plans call for empirical research to measure student, staff, administration, and patient outcomes. Significance to nursing education: Feedback indicated a more meaningful and varied experience in a stable supportive environment. Since the Medical-Surgical clinicals will be repeated on similar units under one management, students will not loose a clinical day for orientation. Anecdotal feedback hints of more rapid progression in learning skills, critical thinking, time management, and leadership capabilities Significance to nursing practice: The staff developed better expertise in educating students, which has potential for greater job satisfaction. Other long-term outcomes for patient safety and satisfaction should be measured in the future. Students facilitated lower staffing ratios. Recent research indicates evidence of high patient-to-nurse ratios increases surgical patients' mortality along with burnout and job dissatisfaction (Aiken, Clarke, Sloane, Sochalski, and Silber, 2002). Significance to nursing administration: Administration also achieved the benefits of academic, community, and service partnerships. Students will assess organizational culture over several semesters, which reduces culture shock upon graduation. The DEUs provided the student and organization opportunities to evaluate the potential fit for a nursing staff position. Then $80,000 orientation costs/nurse are reduced while improving patient outcomes. Finally, students were informed of the visions and values of leadership so they could role model these attibutes.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDesignated Education Units: Linking Academia with Practice and Administrationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149216-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Designated Education Units: Linking Academia with Practice and Administration</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Carr, MaryAnn, DNSc, RN, CS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Pacific Lutheran University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Clinical Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">carrma@plu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Dissatisfaction by clinical nurses, academia, and management lead to discussions for a different approach to education. The concept of the Designated Education Units (DEU) was developed from Flinders University of South Australia (Edgecombe, Wotten, Gonda, and Mason, 1999). This abstract highlights initial outcomes from a northwest baccalaureate school's collaborative project with two Medical-Surgical sites after one semester. Junior/Senior students plus RNs gave anonymous written feedback collected at the end of previous clinicals about students' experiences and RN-student mentorship. Future plans call for empirical research to measure student, staff, administration, and patient outcomes. Significance to nursing education: Feedback indicated a more meaningful and varied experience in a stable supportive environment. Since the Medical-Surgical clinicals will be repeated on similar units under one management, students will not loose a clinical day for orientation. Anecdotal feedback hints of more rapid progression in learning skills, critical thinking, time management, and leadership capabilities Significance to nursing practice: The staff developed better expertise in educating students, which has potential for greater job satisfaction. Other long-term outcomes for patient safety and satisfaction should be measured in the future. Students facilitated lower staffing ratios. Recent research indicates evidence of high patient-to-nurse ratios increases surgical patients' mortality along with burnout and job dissatisfaction (Aiken, Clarke, Sloane, Sochalski, and Silber, 2002). Significance to nursing administration: Administration also achieved the benefits of academic, community, and service partnerships. Students will assess organizational culture over several semesters, which reduces culture shock upon graduation. The DEUs provided the student and organization opportunities to evaluate the potential fit for a nursing staff position. Then $80,000 orientation costs/nurse are reduced while improving patient outcomes. Finally, students were informed of the visions and values of leadership so they could role model these attibutes.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:58:12Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:58:12Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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