Hiring and Training Nursing Assistive Personnel for the Acute Care Setting

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149223
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Hiring and Training Nursing Assistive Personnel for the Acute Care Setting
Abstract:
Hiring and Training Nursing Assistive Personnel for the Acute Care Setting
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Author:Ceppetelli, Ellen B., MS, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center
. The author will describe how the challenge of 30 licensed nurse assistant (LNA) vacancies led to the development of an innovative model for hiring and training LNAs for the acute care setting of Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center (DHMC). The process began with an intra-organizational collaboration between the Office of Nursing and Human Resources. This resulted in trainees being hired to a specific unit and paid full-time wages during the five weeks of comprehensive classroom and clinical training. New partnerships were created with a NH nursing home and a Vermont vocational high school for the delivery of their training programs to DHMC trainees. Evaluation data collected from trainees, faculty, preceptors, managers and directors involved in these two programs resulted in the final product, a LNA training program at DHMC. Close collaboration with the New Hampshire Board of Nursing was essential in designing clinical training. The approved ratio of one faculty member supervising eight trainees on one unit, so successful for nursing home and small community hospital LNA training programs was not feasible. High patient acuity levels limited the number of trainees placed on each unit. All trainees who participated in this program in the past two years have successfully passed the licensing exam for nurse assistants in New Hampshire. The outcomes of this program have been high trainee and colleague satisfaction, low LNA turnover rates, and improved quality of LNA training. A significant number are now enrolled in pre-nursing electives.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHiring and Training Nursing Assistive Personnel for the Acute Care Settingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149223-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Hiring and Training Nursing Assistive Personnel for the Acute Care Setting</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Ceppetelli, Ellen B., MS, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Ellen.Ceppetelli@Hitchcock.org</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">. The author will describe how the challenge of 30 licensed nurse assistant (LNA) vacancies led to the development of an innovative model for hiring and training LNAs for the acute care setting of Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center (DHMC). The process began with an intra-organizational collaboration between the Office of Nursing and Human Resources. This resulted in trainees being hired to a specific unit and paid full-time wages during the five weeks of comprehensive classroom and clinical training. New partnerships were created with a NH nursing home and a Vermont vocational high school for the delivery of their training programs to DHMC trainees. Evaluation data collected from trainees, faculty, preceptors, managers and directors involved in these two programs resulted in the final product, a LNA training program at DHMC. Close collaboration with the New Hampshire Board of Nursing was essential in designing clinical training. The approved ratio of one faculty member supervising eight trainees on one unit, so successful for nursing home and small community hospital LNA training programs was not feasible. High patient acuity levels limited the number of trainees placed on each unit. All trainees who participated in this program in the past two years have successfully passed the licensing exam for nurse assistants in New Hampshire. The outcomes of this program have been high trainee and colleague satisfaction, low LNA turnover rates, and improved quality of LNA training. A significant number are now enrolled in pre-nursing electives.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:58:20Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:58:20Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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