From Life in Ugly Brown Shoes to Wearing Walking Shoes: Experiences of Aging Polio Survivors

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149226
Type:
Presentation
Title:
From Life in Ugly Brown Shoes to Wearing Walking Shoes: Experiences of Aging Polio Survivors
Abstract:
From Life in Ugly Brown Shoes to Wearing Walking Shoes: Experiences of Aging Polio Survivors
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Author:Charron, Sue Ann, PhD, ARNP
P.I. Institution Name:Barry University
Title:Associate Professor
Co-Authors:Sande Gracia Jones, PhD, ARNP, ACRN, C, CS, BC
Purpose: The purpose of this phenomenological study was to more fully understand the lived experiences of polio survivors over a 40 to 50 year period. Design: A qualitative phenomenological design was used. Population, Sample, Setting: A convenience sample of seven female participants representing three ethnic groups ranging in age from 50 to 68 years was selected. Participants were interviewed in settings of their choice. Concept: Participants were asked to describe what it was like to be a polio survivor. Method: Initial taped interviews explored the lived experiences of participants as polio survivors. Data analysis was ongoing throughout the study. Data were reviewed and organized into essential elements that described experiences. After initial reading of each transcript to establish an overall meaning of the experience, transcripts were then analyzed line-by-line to identify key elements of participant’s experiences. Member checks were conducted in follow-up interviews to ensure trustworthiness of the data. Common experiences were grouped together to form major themes. Findings: Themes portrayed the chronological process of surviving the initial illness, recovery, and life with post-polio syndrome. Major themes were “Life in Ugly Brown Shoes”, “Life in High Heels”, and “Wearing Walking Shoes”. Participants indicated they had not really felt disabled until they experienced new symptoms of post-polio syndrome in later life. Additionally, whereas these women have previously used the coping strategy of persevering through pain and “fighting on”, they are cautioned by health care providers to slow down and avoid overuse of muscles because of post-polio syndrome. Conclusions: Aging polio survivors need to modify coping skills to adapt to new symptoms. A major adjustment for some polio survivors is dealing with feeling “disabled” after believing they had adjusted and “fit in” all their lives. Implications: Findings have implications for nursing and health care of aging polio survivors on a global basis.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFrom Life in Ugly Brown Shoes to Wearing Walking Shoes: Experiences of Aging Polio Survivorsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149226-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">From Life in Ugly Brown Shoes to Wearing Walking Shoes: Experiences of Aging Polio Survivors</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Charron, Sue Ann, PhD, ARNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Barry University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">scharron@mail.barry.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Sande Gracia Jones, PhD, ARNP, ACRN, C, CS, BC</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this phenomenological study was to more fully understand the lived experiences of polio survivors over a 40 to 50 year period. Design: A qualitative phenomenological design was used. Population, Sample, Setting: A convenience sample of seven female participants representing three ethnic groups ranging in age from 50 to 68 years was selected. Participants were interviewed in settings of their choice. Concept: Participants were asked to describe what it was like to be a polio survivor. Method: Initial taped interviews explored the lived experiences of participants as polio survivors. Data analysis was ongoing throughout the study. Data were reviewed and organized into essential elements that described experiences. After initial reading of each transcript to establish an overall meaning of the experience, transcripts were then analyzed line-by-line to identify key elements of participant&rsquo;s experiences. Member checks were conducted in follow-up interviews to ensure trustworthiness of the data. Common experiences were grouped together to form major themes. Findings: Themes portrayed the chronological process of surviving the initial illness, recovery, and life with post-polio syndrome. Major themes were &ldquo;Life in Ugly Brown Shoes&rdquo;, &ldquo;Life in High Heels&rdquo;, and &ldquo;Wearing Walking Shoes&rdquo;. Participants indicated they had not really felt disabled until they experienced new symptoms of post-polio syndrome in later life. Additionally, whereas these women have previously used the coping strategy of persevering through pain and &ldquo;fighting on&rdquo;, they are cautioned by health care providers to slow down and avoid overuse of muscles because of post-polio syndrome. Conclusions: Aging polio survivors need to modify coping skills to adapt to new symptoms. A major adjustment for some polio survivors is dealing with feeling &ldquo;disabled&rdquo; after believing they had adjusted and &ldquo;fit in&rdquo; all their lives. Implications: Findings have implications for nursing and health care of aging polio survivors on a global basis.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:58:23Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:58:23Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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