Relationship between lipodystrophy-associated symptoms and medication adherence in persons infected with HIV/AIDS

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149229
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Relationship between lipodystrophy-associated symptoms and medication adherence in persons infected with HIV/AIDS
Abstract:
Relationship between lipodystrophy-associated symptoms and medication adherence in persons infected with HIV/AIDS
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Author:Corless, Inge B., RN, PhD, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:Massachusetts General Hospital Institute of Health Professions
Title:Professor
Co-Authors:Kenn M. Kirksey, RN, PhD, APRN, BC; Patrice Kenneally Nicholas, RN, DNSc, MPH, ANP; Jeanne Kemppainen, RN, PhD, CNS; Margaret E. Mueller, RN, MSN
Lipodystrophy-associated manifestations such as body fat changes, and increases in glucose and lipid levels remain a challenge for HIV-infected persons and their providers. Given that side effects of medications, as well as symptomatic HIV disease have been implicated in non-adherence, the implications of lipodystrophy for adherence are a concern. Objective: This study was designed to determine the relationship between time of initial diagnosis, presence of lipodystrophic symptomatology, and adherence to medication regimens in persons with HIV/AIDS. Design: Cross-sectional, descriptive design. Population, Sample, Setting: The sample consisted of 165 persons from three outpatient HIV clinics in Boston MA, Fresno CA, and Victoria TX. Variables: This paper examined the relationship between lipodystrophic symptoms seen in HIV/AIDS and adherence to antiretroviral medications. Methods: Participants were asked to complete open-ended questions regarding presence and types of lipodystrophy-associated symptoms, self-reported management of body fat alterations, and how these physical changes made them feel. Adherence was measured using the Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS). Findings: On a Likert-type scale ranging from 0-4, with “0” indicating “very adherent” and “4” indicating “non-adherent,” the mean score on the MMAS was 1.44 (SD + 1.34). This finding demonstrated that the participants consistently took their medications despite self-reports of significant numbers of HIV disease and treatment-related body fat changes. However, there was a negative correlation between medication adherence and years of HIV positive status. Conclusions: These findings are somewhat in contrast to what is widely reported in the scientific literature. Subjects in this study did report a high level of adherence to medication regimens despite the purported association with lipodystrophy. Length of time since initial diagnosis with HIV, however, had a negative impact on medication adherence. Implications: Further research is required to examine adherence over time. Prospective studies that evaluate symptoms and adherence issues in HIV-infected persons are also warranted.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRelationship between lipodystrophy-associated symptoms and medication adherence in persons infected with HIV/AIDSen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149229-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Relationship between lipodystrophy-associated symptoms and medication adherence in persons infected with HIV/AIDS</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Corless, Inge B., RN, PhD, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Massachusetts General Hospital Institute of Health Professions</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">icorless@mghihp.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Kenn M. Kirksey, RN, PhD, APRN, BC; Patrice Kenneally Nicholas, RN, DNSc, MPH, ANP; Jeanne Kemppainen, RN, PhD, CNS; Margaret E. Mueller, RN, MSN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Lipodystrophy-associated manifestations such as body fat changes, and increases in glucose and lipid levels remain a challenge for HIV-infected persons and their providers. Given that side effects of medications, as well as symptomatic HIV disease have been implicated in non-adherence, the implications of lipodystrophy for adherence are a concern. Objective: This study was designed to determine the relationship between time of initial diagnosis, presence of lipodystrophic symptomatology, and adherence to medication regimens in persons with HIV/AIDS. Design: Cross-sectional, descriptive design. Population, Sample, Setting: The sample consisted of 165 persons from three outpatient HIV clinics in Boston MA, Fresno CA, and Victoria TX. Variables: This paper examined the relationship between lipodystrophic symptoms seen in HIV/AIDS and adherence to antiretroviral medications. Methods: Participants were asked to complete open-ended questions regarding presence and types of lipodystrophy-associated symptoms, self-reported management of body fat alterations, and how these physical changes made them feel. Adherence was measured using the Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS). Findings: On a Likert-type scale ranging from 0-4, with &ldquo;0&rdquo; indicating &ldquo;very adherent&rdquo; and &ldquo;4&rdquo; indicating &ldquo;non-adherent,&rdquo; the mean score on the MMAS was 1.44 (SD + 1.34). This finding demonstrated that the participants consistently took their medications despite self-reports of significant numbers of HIV disease and treatment-related body fat changes. However, there was a negative correlation between medication adherence and years of HIV positive status. Conclusions: These findings are somewhat in contrast to what is widely reported in the scientific literature. Subjects in this study did report a high level of adherence to medication regimens despite the purported association with lipodystrophy. Length of time since initial diagnosis with HIV, however, had a negative impact on medication adherence. Implications: Further research is required to examine adherence over time. Prospective studies that evaluate symptoms and adherence issues in HIV-infected persons are also warranted.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:58:26Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:58:26Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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