Parenting Sense of Competence, Stress, Social Support and Mood States in Mothers of Twins

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149238
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Parenting Sense of Competence, Stress, Social Support and Mood States in Mothers of Twins
Abstract:
Parenting Sense of Competence, Stress, Social Support and Mood States in Mothers of Twins
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Author:Damato, Elizabeth G., PhD, RN, CS
P.I. Institution Name:Case Western Reserve University
Title:Assistant Professor
OBJECTIVE: Previous research in mothers of singletons has found childrearing makes greater demands on maternal mental health than the birth itself. Childrearing demands of twins are exceptionally high and pose unique challenges mothers may not anticipate. This study examined whether parenting stress, sense of competence, and social support predicted maternal mood in mothers of twins. DESIGN: A mailed questionnaire was designed following the methods of Dillman (2000). Subjects were recruited over an eight month period via newsletter and website postings of a national mothers of twins support group. SAMPLE: The sample consisted of 143 mothers of twins less than 2 years of age. VARIABLES: Two dimensions of parenting sense of competence (efficacy and satisfaction), and of social support (subjective and instrumental), and parenting distress were evaluated as predictors of positive and negative mood. Maternal age, education, family income, number of children, age of twins, and previous history of depression were covariates. METHODS: Instruments included the Multiple Affect Adjective Check-List Revised, Parenting Distress subscale of the Parenting Stress Index, efficacy and satisfaction subscales of the Parenting Sense of Competence Scale, Instrumental & Subjective Support scales from the Duke Social Support Index, and a demographic data tool. FINDINGS: The study variables explained 42.5% of the variance in positive mood and 22.4% of the variance in negative mood. Women with lower level of parenting distress and higher reported efficacy on the parenting competence scale reported more positive mood. Women with lower satisfaction on the parenting competence scale reported more negative mood. CONCLUSIONS: Parenting stress and sense of competence influence mood states in mothers of young twins. Sense of competence may overcome the frustration these mothers often experience. IMPLICATIONS: Nursing interventions that decrease parenting stress and increase sense of competence can be developed to promote positive psychological adjustment in mothers of twins.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleParenting Sense of Competence, Stress, Social Support and Mood States in Mothers of Twinsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149238-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Parenting Sense of Competence, Stress, Social Support and Mood States in Mothers of Twins</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Damato, Elizabeth G., PhD, RN, CS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Case Western Reserve University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">egd@po.cwru.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">OBJECTIVE: Previous research in mothers of singletons has found childrearing makes greater demands on maternal mental health than the birth itself. Childrearing demands of twins are exceptionally high and pose unique challenges mothers may not anticipate. This study examined whether parenting stress, sense of competence, and social support predicted maternal mood in mothers of twins. DESIGN: A mailed questionnaire was designed following the methods of Dillman (2000). Subjects were recruited over an eight month period via newsletter and website postings of a national mothers of twins support group. SAMPLE: The sample consisted of 143 mothers of twins less than 2 years of age. VARIABLES: Two dimensions of parenting sense of competence (efficacy and satisfaction), and of social support (subjective and instrumental), and parenting distress were evaluated as predictors of positive and negative mood. Maternal age, education, family income, number of children, age of twins, and previous history of depression were covariates. METHODS: Instruments included the Multiple Affect Adjective Check-List Revised, Parenting Distress subscale of the Parenting Stress Index, efficacy and satisfaction subscales of the Parenting Sense of Competence Scale, Instrumental &amp; Subjective Support scales from the Duke Social Support Index, and a demographic data tool. FINDINGS: The study variables explained 42.5% of the variance in positive mood and 22.4% of the variance in negative mood. Women with lower level of parenting distress and higher reported efficacy on the parenting competence scale reported more positive mood. Women with lower satisfaction on the parenting competence scale reported more negative mood. CONCLUSIONS: Parenting stress and sense of competence influence mood states in mothers of young twins. Sense of competence may overcome the frustration these mothers often experience. IMPLICATIONS: Nursing interventions that decrease parenting stress and increase sense of competence can be developed to promote positive psychological adjustment in mothers of twins.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:58:36Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:58:36Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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