Efficacy of Hand Massage for Enhancing Comfort and Reducing Physical Symptoms for Persons at End of Life

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149241
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Efficacy of Hand Massage for Enhancing Comfort and Reducing Physical Symptoms for Persons at End of Life
Abstract:
Efficacy of Hand Massage for Enhancing Comfort and Reducing Physical Symptoms for Persons at End of Life
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Author:Dowd, Therese, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:The University of Akron
Title:Associate Professor
Co-Authors:Katharine Kolcaba, PhD, RN; Richard Steiner, PhD
The problem addressed by this experimental pilot study was to find non-invasive, non-pharmacological, inexpensive, and easy-to administer nursing interventions that enhance holistic comfort and reduce physical symptoms for patients near end of life. In this study, guided by Kolcaba’s Comfort Theory, hand massage was given twice a week for three weeks by trained nurses. The comparison group received the intervention once at the end of the study. Also at the end of the study, both groups received a pamphlet about how professional and nonprofessional caregivers can perform the intervention. Through collaboration with three hospice agencies, participants who met the inclusion criteria of K score of 40 or greater were recruited. Then, after signing informed consent, they were randomized into treatment or control groups. Both groups completed the Hospice Comfort Questionnaire and Symptom Distress Scale weekly for three weeks. The first data collection point in the treatment group was prior to receiving the intervention. Seventeen persons (9 men and 23 women) with an age range from 37 to 72.7 completed the study. Analysis with repeated measures multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) found that there were no significant differences on comfort between the two groups with this small sample size. However, the means on the HCQ revealed that both groups decreased on comfort at Time 2, but the treatment group score increased at Time 3 while the comparison group continued to decrease. Symptoms of physical distress remained flat for both groups over the three time points. Trends offer preliminary rationale to repeat the study with a larger sample. Hand massage is a simple, comforting intervention that every one can do. Anecdotal data revealed that most persons really liked the intervention and persons giving hand massage also felt a strong connection to recipients.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEfficacy of Hand Massage for Enhancing Comfort and Reducing Physical Symptoms for Persons at End of Lifeen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149241-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Efficacy of Hand Massage for Enhancing Comfort and Reducing Physical Symptoms for Persons at End of Life</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Dowd, Therese, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">The University of Akron</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dowd@uakron.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Katharine Kolcaba, PhD, RN; Richard Steiner, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The problem addressed by this experimental pilot study was to find non-invasive, non-pharmacological, inexpensive, and easy-to administer nursing interventions that enhance holistic comfort and reduce physical symptoms for patients near end of life. In this study, guided by Kolcaba&rsquo;s Comfort Theory, hand massage was given twice a week for three weeks by trained nurses. The comparison group received the intervention once at the end of the study. Also at the end of the study, both groups received a pamphlet about how professional and nonprofessional caregivers can perform the intervention. Through collaboration with three hospice agencies, participants who met the inclusion criteria of K score of 40 or greater were recruited. Then, after signing informed consent, they were randomized into treatment or control groups. Both groups completed the Hospice Comfort Questionnaire and Symptom Distress Scale weekly for three weeks. The first data collection point in the treatment group was prior to receiving the intervention. Seventeen persons (9 men and 23 women) with an age range from 37 to 72.7 completed the study. Analysis with repeated measures multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) found that there were no significant differences on comfort between the two groups with this small sample size. However, the means on the HCQ revealed that both groups decreased on comfort at Time 2, but the treatment group score increased at Time 3 while the comparison group continued to decrease. Symptoms of physical distress remained flat for both groups over the three time points. Trends offer preliminary rationale to repeat the study with a larger sample. Hand massage is a simple, comforting intervention that every one can do. Anecdotal data revealed that most persons really liked the intervention and persons giving hand massage also felt a strong connection to recipients.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:58:39Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:58:39Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.