Development & Psychometric Evaluation of the Child-Adolescent Teasing Scale

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149244
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Development & Psychometric Evaluation of the Child-Adolescent Teasing Scale
Abstract:
Development & Psychometric Evaluation of the Child-Adolescent Teasing Scale
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Author:Duffy, Mary E., PhD, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:Boston College
Title:professor and director, center for nursing research
Co-Authors:Judith A. Vessey, PhD, MBA, FAAN; June A. Horowitz, PhD, FAAN; Karen L. Carlson, RNC, PhD; Joan F. Bradley, RN, MSN; Carolyn Montoya, RN, MSN, PNP; Joyce David, BSN, MSNc
Development & Psychometric Evaluation of the Child-Adolescent Teasing Scale Objective: This study's purpose was to develop and psychometrically evaluate the CATS in middle-school youth. Design: methodological Population, Sample, Setting: The initial study population (n=708) was middle-school youth from Massachusetts, Mississippi, Montana, New Mexico, and North Carolina. The final sample (n=546) for this psychometric evaluation had no missing data on the CATS. This sample was 11-14 years; 53% female; 73% white, 11% Latino/Hispanic, 10% Black/African American and 6.5% other racial/ethnic heritage. Over 68% reported grades of mostly A's and B's. Concepts and Variables Studied: Initially, 70 items were derived from the previously described focus groups to measure the four major constructs underpinning the CATS. These reflected Teasing about: a) Physical Appearance (n=18)), b) Personality & Behavior (n=17), c) Family & Environment (n=17), and d) School (n=18). Methods: The instrument was designed, pilot-tested, and then administered to 6-8th grade students. Findings: The Cronbach's alpha internal consistency reliability, computed on the 70-items CATS, was .95. Only items with item-total correlations > .50 were retained for subsequent analyses. The 34 retained CATS items were subjected to principal components analysis with varimax rotation and Kaiser normalization. Eight initial factors with eigenvalues > 1 emerged, accounting for 65.2% of variance. A four-factor solution was then specified and accounted for 51.2% of variance. Factor 1, Personality & Behavior Teasing (14 items; Cronbach's alpha, .91), explained 18.4% of variance; Factor 2, School-Related Teasing (9 items; Cronbach's alpha, .84); explained 12.4%; Factor 3, Family & Environment Teasing (7 items; Cronbach's alpha, .84) accounted for 11.8% of variance; and Factor 4, Physical Size Teasing (2 items, Cronbach's alpha, .85) accounted for 8.6% of variance. Conclusions & Implications: The 34 items CATS subscales demonstrated sufficient internal consistency reliability and construct (factorial) validity for use in subsequent research with middle-school children.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDevelopment & Psychometric Evaluation of the Child-Adolescent Teasing Scaleen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149244-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Development &amp; Psychometric Evaluation of the Child-Adolescent Teasing Scale</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Duffy, Mary E., PhD, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Boston College</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">professor and director, center for nursing research</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mary.duffy.1@bc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Judith A. Vessey, PhD, MBA, FAAN; June A. Horowitz, PhD, FAAN; Karen L. Carlson, RNC, PhD; Joan F. Bradley, RN, MSN; Carolyn Montoya, RN, MSN, PNP; Joyce David, BSN, MSNc</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Development &amp; Psychometric Evaluation of the Child-Adolescent Teasing Scale Objective: This study's purpose was to develop and psychometrically evaluate the CATS in middle-school youth. Design: methodological Population, Sample, Setting: The initial study population (n=708) was middle-school youth from Massachusetts, Mississippi, Montana, New Mexico, and North Carolina. The final sample (n=546) for this psychometric evaluation had no missing data on the CATS. This sample was 11-14 years; 53% female; 73% white, 11% Latino/Hispanic, 10% Black/African American and 6.5% other racial/ethnic heritage. Over 68% reported grades of mostly A's and B's. Concepts and Variables Studied: Initially, 70 items were derived from the previously described focus groups to measure the four major constructs underpinning the CATS. These reflected Teasing about: a) Physical Appearance (n=18)), b) Personality &amp; Behavior (n=17), c) Family &amp; Environment (n=17), and d) School (n=18). Methods: The instrument was designed, pilot-tested, and then administered to 6-8th grade students. Findings: The Cronbach's alpha internal consistency reliability, computed on the 70-items CATS, was .95. Only items with item-total correlations &gt; .50 were retained for subsequent analyses. The 34 retained CATS items were subjected to principal components analysis with varimax rotation and Kaiser normalization. Eight initial factors with eigenvalues &gt; 1 emerged, accounting for 65.2% of variance. A four-factor solution was then specified and accounted for 51.2% of variance. Factor 1, Personality &amp; Behavior Teasing (14 items; Cronbach's alpha, .91), explained 18.4% of variance; Factor 2, School-Related Teasing (9 items; Cronbach's alpha, .84); explained 12.4%; Factor 3, Family &amp; Environment Teasing (7 items; Cronbach's alpha, .84) accounted for 11.8% of variance; and Factor 4, Physical Size Teasing (2 items, Cronbach's alpha, .85) accounted for 8.6% of variance. Conclusions &amp; Implications: The 34 items CATS subscales demonstrated sufficient internal consistency reliability and construct (factorial) validity for use in subsequent research with middle-school children.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:58:42Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:58:42Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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