A Randomized Comparison Study of the Efficacy of Cognitive Nursing Intervention for the Self-Management of Auditory Hallucinations

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149251
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Randomized Comparison Study of the Efficacy of Cognitive Nursing Intervention for the Self-Management of Auditory Hallucinations
Abstract:
A Randomized Comparison Study of the Efficacy of Cognitive Nursing Intervention for the Self-Management of Auditory Hallucinations
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Author:England, Margaret Caroline, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Windsor
Title:Associate Professor
Recent clinical trials indicate potential benefits of cognitive therapy for the self-management of intrusive, malevolent, hard-to-avoid auditory hallucinations. The purpose of this repeated measures, quasi-experimental comparison study was to determine the efficacy of a cognitive nursing intervention (CNI) for improving health-related quality of life of 32 mostly white, community-dwelling voice hearers assigned a DSM-IV diagnosis of schizophrenia. The research was grounded in the perspective that voice hearers can enhance their ability to relate in a meaningful way with both themselves and their "voices" by considering the holistic nature and worthiness of particular voice events. Subjects were randomly assigned to receive CNI plus standard care (CNI+ST) (n=17) or standard care (ST) (n=15). Participants in the CNI+ST condition received 90-minute sessions of CNI each week over a period of 12 weeks. Subjects completed an inventory of their voice experiences at the beginning of the sessions; and developed cue cards as prompts for coping in the later half of the sessions. Data on outcome variables were obtained at baseline, 3 months, and 15 months after initiation of treatment. According to the research, subjects in the CNI+ST condition relative to the ST condition, reported significantly more improvement in depression and other psychiatric symptoms, self-esteem, and health-related quality of life; and limited improvement in subjective deficit symptoms. Although subjects in both conditions reported significant improvement in distressing auditory hallucinations, only the subjects in the CNI+ST condition sustained the improvement over time. At a 3 month follow-up evaluation, 12 (70.1%) CNI+ST subjects and no ST subjects showed a 50% or greater improvement in psychiatric symptoms, self-esteem, and health-related quality of life. One year later, 11 of the 12 (91.7%) CNI+ST subjects had sustained their gains. These findings provide encouragement for researchers to continue with development of cognitive nursing interventions for the self-management of distressing auditory hallucinations.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Randomized Comparison Study of the Efficacy of Cognitive Nursing Intervention for the Self-Management of Auditory Hallucinationsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149251-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A Randomized Comparison Study of the Efficacy of Cognitive Nursing Intervention for the Self-Management of Auditory Hallucinations</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">England, Margaret Caroline, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Windsor</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mengland@uwindsor.ca</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Recent clinical trials indicate potential benefits of cognitive therapy for the self-management of intrusive, malevolent, hard-to-avoid auditory hallucinations. The purpose of this repeated measures, quasi-experimental comparison study was to determine the efficacy of a cognitive nursing intervention (CNI) for improving health-related quality of life of 32 mostly white, community-dwelling voice hearers assigned a DSM-IV diagnosis of schizophrenia. The research was grounded in the perspective that voice hearers can enhance their ability to relate in a meaningful way with both themselves and their &quot;voices&quot; by considering the holistic nature and worthiness of particular voice events. Subjects were randomly assigned to receive CNI plus standard care (CNI+ST) (n=17) or standard care (ST) (n=15). Participants in the CNI+ST condition received 90-minute sessions of CNI each week over a period of 12 weeks. Subjects completed an inventory of their voice experiences at the beginning of the sessions; and developed cue cards as prompts for coping in the later half of the sessions. Data on outcome variables were obtained at baseline, 3 months, and 15 months after initiation of treatment. According to the research, subjects in the CNI+ST condition relative to the ST condition, reported significantly more improvement in depression and other psychiatric symptoms, self-esteem, and health-related quality of life; and limited improvement in subjective deficit symptoms. Although subjects in both conditions reported significant improvement in distressing auditory hallucinations, only the subjects in the CNI+ST condition sustained the improvement over time. At a 3 month follow-up evaluation, 12 (70.1%) CNI+ST subjects and no ST subjects showed a 50% or greater improvement in psychiatric symptoms, self-esteem, and health-related quality of life. One year later, 11 of the 12 (91.7%) CNI+ST subjects had sustained their gains. These findings provide encouragement for researchers to continue with development of cognitive nursing interventions for the self-management of distressing auditory hallucinations.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:58:50Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:58:50Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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