Stability of Preterm Infant Responses to Heelsticks and Axillary Temperatures

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149252
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Stability of Preterm Infant Responses to Heelsticks and Axillary Temperatures
Abstract:
Stability of Preterm Infant Responses to Heelsticks and Axillary Temperatures
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Author:Evans, Jane C., PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Medical College of Ohio
Title:Professor and Director, Center for Nursing Research and Evaluation
Co-Authors:Eliza McCartney, MS, RNC, CPNP, CNS; Gretchen Lawhon, RN, PhD
OBJECTIVE: Determine which biobehavioral responses within the Preterm Infant Pain Profile (PIPP) are reliably present in at least 80% of an individual infant's responses to repetitions of heelsticks and axillary temperatures. DESIGN: Longitudinal descriptive comparative. POPULATION: A convenience sample of 81 preterm infants was recruited from a Level III NICU between 1999-2001. CONCEPTS: Theoretical model combined Levine's (1967) Conservation Model and Als (1982) Synactive Theory of Development. Biobehavioral variables: heart rate, oxygen saturation, eye squeeze, brow bulge, nasolabial furrow, and Preterm Infant Pain Profile (PIPP) scores. Contextual variables: gestational age, state, severity of illness, and number of prior painful procedures. METHODS: Computer acquisition of physiological data synchronized with real time video recordings from 4 cameras captured caregiving activities and infant behavior for 4 hours every day during the first week of life, and weekly thereafter until discharge. Caregiving procedures and facial behaviors were coded from the videotapes into 3 epochs: two minute baseline, procedure, and two minutes following. Standard PIPP scores were also calculated. Data analysis included ANOVA, repeated measures ANOVA, regression, and descriptive statistics FINDINGS: Preliminary analysis of the first caregiving procedures in a cluster yielded the following: A) Heelsticks: only heart rate increases were reliably present (96.2%), oxygen desaturations were present 59.2%, brow bulge 14.8%, eye squeeze 14.8% and nasolabial furrow 7.4%. B) Axillary temperature: again, only heart rate increases were reliably present (96.1%), oxygen desaturations were present 34.6%, brow bulge 1.9%, eye squeeze 3.8%, and nasolabial furrow 1.9%. CONCLUSIONS: Heart rate increases did not discriminate between heelstick and axillary temperature. Oxygen desaturations, brow bulge, eye squeeze, and nasolabial furrow were not reliably present with either procedure. IMPLICATIONS: Heart rate increases, oxygen desaturations, brow bulge, eye squeeze, and nasolabial furrows are not reliable indicators of pain in the preterm infant.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleStability of Preterm Infant Responses to Heelsticks and Axillary Temperaturesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149252-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Stability of Preterm Infant Responses to Heelsticks and Axillary Temperatures</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Evans, Jane C., PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Medical College of Ohio</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor and Director, Center for Nursing Research and Evaluation</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jevans@mco.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Eliza McCartney, MS, RNC, CPNP, CNS; Gretchen Lawhon, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">OBJECTIVE: Determine which biobehavioral responses within the Preterm Infant Pain Profile (PIPP) are reliably present in at least 80% of an individual infant's responses to repetitions of heelsticks and axillary temperatures. DESIGN: Longitudinal descriptive comparative. POPULATION: A convenience sample of 81 preterm infants was recruited from a Level III NICU between 1999-2001. CONCEPTS: Theoretical model combined Levine's (1967) Conservation Model and Als (1982) Synactive Theory of Development. Biobehavioral variables: heart rate, oxygen saturation, eye squeeze, brow bulge, nasolabial furrow, and Preterm Infant Pain Profile (PIPP) scores. Contextual variables: gestational age, state, severity of illness, and number of prior painful procedures. METHODS: Computer acquisition of physiological data synchronized with real time video recordings from 4 cameras captured caregiving activities and infant behavior for 4 hours every day during the first week of life, and weekly thereafter until discharge. Caregiving procedures and facial behaviors were coded from the videotapes into 3 epochs: two minute baseline, procedure, and two minutes following. Standard PIPP scores were also calculated. Data analysis included ANOVA, repeated measures ANOVA, regression, and descriptive statistics FINDINGS: Preliminary analysis of the first caregiving procedures in a cluster yielded the following: A) Heelsticks: only heart rate increases were reliably present (96.2%), oxygen desaturations were present 59.2%, brow bulge 14.8%, eye squeeze 14.8% and nasolabial furrow 7.4%. B) Axillary temperature: again, only heart rate increases were reliably present (96.1%), oxygen desaturations were present 34.6%, brow bulge 1.9%, eye squeeze 3.8%, and nasolabial furrow 1.9%. CONCLUSIONS: Heart rate increases did not discriminate between heelstick and axillary temperature. Oxygen desaturations, brow bulge, eye squeeze, and nasolabial furrow were not reliably present with either procedure. IMPLICATIONS: Heart rate increases, oxygen desaturations, brow bulge, eye squeeze, and nasolabial furrows are not reliable indicators of pain in the preterm infant.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:58:51Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:58:51Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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