Linking Cultural Competence and Community Service Learning: An International Experience

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149263
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Linking Cultural Competence and Community Service Learning: An International Experience
Abstract:
Linking Cultural Competence and Community Service Learning: An International Experience
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Author:Gonzales, Irene, PhD, RN, CNP
P.I. Institution Name:San Jose State University
Title:Associate Professor--Pediatrics
In Cusco, Peru, there are approximately 7000 street children who survive by drawing and painting in the streets, creating beautiful artwork that is sold to visiting tourists. Huch’uy Runas (Quechua for: “little highly evolved people”) is a refuge for street children between the ages of 5 and 16 years of age. Some of the children have been orphaned or abandoned, and live-in full time. These at-risk children suffer from chronic nutritional, dermatologic, and gastrointestinal problems. Safety, hygiene, dental care, and other anticipatory guidance concerns are common. As part of a university community service learning grant, students and nurse practitioner faculty lived in Cusco for a month and ran a pediatric primary care clinic. Based on needs assessment results, students ran workshops in “handwashing”, “first-aid”, and “lice screening and treatment.” The group worked closely with staff and teachers at Huch’uy Runas, and held first aid classes for them and the older children. The students and faculty helped to link a medicinal plant community project to Huch’uy Runas, and helped the children to plant, care for, and utilize these plants for their own use in preventing and curing illness. In an ever increasing challenge to provide clinical experiences for graduate and undergraduate nursing students, a link was created between the classroom and an international community of children in need. In exchange, students and faculty enhanced their cultural sensitivity, learned and practiced a new language, and had the opportunity to practice in an environment where resources were limited. The group toured a hospital in Lima, a local indigenous healthcare clinic in Cusco, and a community project that grows and harvests traditional medicinal plants. This United States nursing group has been invited to return yearly to maintain this unique connection between practice and theory, and to continue to develop international citizenship and cultural competence.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleLinking Cultural Competence and Community Service Learning: An International Experienceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149263-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Linking Cultural Competence and Community Service Learning: An International Experience</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Gonzales, Irene, PhD, RN, CNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">San Jose State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor--Pediatrics</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">nnp@sfsu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">In Cusco, Peru, there are approximately 7000 street children who survive by drawing and painting in the streets, creating beautiful artwork that is sold to visiting tourists. Huch&rsquo;uy Runas (Quechua for: &ldquo;little highly evolved people&rdquo;) is a refuge for street children between the ages of 5 and 16 years of age. Some of the children have been orphaned or abandoned, and live-in full time. These at-risk children suffer from chronic nutritional, dermatologic, and gastrointestinal problems. Safety, hygiene, dental care, and other anticipatory guidance concerns are common. As part of a university community service learning grant, students and nurse practitioner faculty lived in Cusco for a month and ran a pediatric primary care clinic. Based on needs assessment results, students ran workshops in &ldquo;handwashing&rdquo;, &ldquo;first-aid&rdquo;, and &ldquo;lice screening and treatment.&rdquo; The group worked closely with staff and teachers at Huch&rsquo;uy Runas, and held first aid classes for them and the older children. The students and faculty helped to link a medicinal plant community project to Huch&rsquo;uy Runas, and helped the children to plant, care for, and utilize these plants for their own use in preventing and curing illness. In an ever increasing challenge to provide clinical experiences for graduate and undergraduate nursing students, a link was created between the classroom and an international community of children in need. In exchange, students and faculty enhanced their cultural sensitivity, learned and practiced a new language, and had the opportunity to practice in an environment where resources were limited. The group toured a hospital in Lima, a local indigenous healthcare clinic in Cusco, and a community project that grows and harvests traditional medicinal plants. This United States nursing group has been invited to return yearly to maintain this unique connection between practice and theory, and to continue to develop international citizenship and cultural competence.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:59:03Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:59:03Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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