Relationship between lipodystrophy-associated morphologic/metabolic changes and depression in persons infected with HIV/AIDS

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149291
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Relationship between lipodystrophy-associated morphologic/metabolic changes and depression in persons infected with HIV/AIDS
Abstract:
Relationship between lipodystrophy-associated morphologic/metabolic changes and depression in persons infected with HIV/AIDS
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Author:Kemppainen, Jeanne, RN, PhD, CNS
P.I. Institution Name:The University of North Carolina at Wilmington
Title:Associate Professor
Co-Authors:Kenn M. Kirksey, RN, PhD, APRN, BC; Patrice Kenneally Nicholas, RN, DNSc, MPH, ANP; Inge B. Corless, RN, PhD, FAAN; Margaret E. Mueller, RN, MSN
Symptoms serve as intervention foci for individuals and healthcare providers. Previous research demonstrates that there is an association between the symptom experience and depression in persons with HIV/AIDS. Objective: This paper reports on the relationship between lipodystrophy-related symptom experiences and depression in persons with HIV disease. Design: A cross-sectional, descriptive design was used. Population, Sample, Setting: Data were obtained from outpatients in three HIV/AIDS clinics in California, Massachusetts, and Texas. The sample was comprised of 64 Caucasians, 51 African-Americans, 44 Hispanics, and 6 others, ranging in age from 21-62 years with a mean age of 42.12 (SD + 8.29). Variables: The variables for this study included depression, body fat and metabolic changes associated with self-reported, HIV-related lipodystrophy symptoms. Methods: The Centers for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) was used to measure depression and four researcher-generated open-ended questions were utilized to obtain data on presence and frequencies of symptoms, management strategies and client ‘feelings’ related to the physical changes. Findings: The mean CES-D (depression) score was 28.96 (SD + 11.62). Scores > 16 on this Likert-type scale are diagnostic for clinical depression. In contrast, the mean score on a single item on the sociodemographic data sheet that asked participants to rank their psychological support on a scale of 1-10 with “1” being “very poor” and “10” being “excellent,” was 6.96 (SD + 2.60). The majority of the sample reported having a number of lipodystrophy-associated symptoms. Approximately 67% of the sample also indicated having one or more comorbidities. Conclusions: Subjects’ responses indicated clinical depression, possibly associated with significant numbers of HIV-associated lipodystrophy symptoms, but they reported moderately high levels of psychological support from significant others. Implications: Randomized clinical trials are indicated to explore better ways of intervening in persons with depression and the presence or absence of other comorbidities (e.g., lipodystrophy, depression).
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRelationship between lipodystrophy-associated morphologic/metabolic changes and depression in persons infected with HIV/AIDSen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149291-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Relationship between lipodystrophy-associated morphologic/metabolic changes and depression in persons infected with HIV/AIDS</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kemppainen, Jeanne, RN, PhD, CNS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">The University of North Carolina at Wilmington</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kemppainenj@uncw.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Kenn M. Kirksey, RN, PhD, APRN, BC; Patrice Kenneally Nicholas, RN, DNSc, MPH, ANP; Inge B. Corless, RN, PhD, FAAN; Margaret E. Mueller, RN, MSN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Symptoms serve as intervention foci for individuals and healthcare providers. Previous research demonstrates that there is an association between the symptom experience and depression in persons with HIV/AIDS. Objective: This paper reports on the relationship between lipodystrophy-related symptom experiences and depression in persons with HIV disease. Design: A cross-sectional, descriptive design was used. Population, Sample, Setting: Data were obtained from outpatients in three HIV/AIDS clinics in California, Massachusetts, and Texas. The sample was comprised of 64 Caucasians, 51 African-Americans, 44 Hispanics, and 6 others, ranging in age from 21-62 years with a mean age of 42.12 (SD + 8.29). Variables: The variables for this study included depression, body fat and metabolic changes associated with self-reported, HIV-related lipodystrophy symptoms. Methods: The Centers for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) was used to measure depression and four researcher-generated open-ended questions were utilized to obtain data on presence and frequencies of symptoms, management strategies and client &lsquo;feelings&rsquo; related to the physical changes. Findings: The mean CES-D (depression) score was 28.96 (SD + 11.62). Scores &gt; 16 on this Likert-type scale are diagnostic for clinical depression. In contrast, the mean score on a single item on the sociodemographic data sheet that asked participants to rank their psychological support on a scale of 1-10 with &ldquo;1&rdquo; being &ldquo;very poor&rdquo; and &ldquo;10&rdquo; being &ldquo;excellent,&rdquo; was 6.96 (SD + 2.60). The majority of the sample reported having a number of lipodystrophy-associated symptoms. Approximately 67% of the sample also indicated having one or more comorbidities. Conclusions: Subjects&rsquo; responses indicated clinical depression, possibly associated with significant numbers of HIV-associated lipodystrophy symptoms, but they reported moderately high levels of psychological support from significant others. Implications: Randomized clinical trials are indicated to explore better ways of intervening in persons with depression and the presence or absence of other comorbidities (e.g., lipodystrophy, depression).</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:59:34Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:59:34Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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