Characteristics of do not resuscitate patients who did not survive hospitalization

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149295
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Characteristics of do not resuscitate patients who did not survive hospitalization
Abstract:
Characteristics of do not resuscitate patients who did not survive hospitalization
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:1991
Author:Fiamingo, Janet, MSN/MN/MNSc/MNE
P.I. Institution Name:The Tampa General Hospital
Title:Education Coordinator
Lives of patients who might otherwise not survive are being prolonged through the use of resuscitative techniques, emergency drugs and other specialized equipment. The quality of life of these patients is not necessarily maintained or enhanced (Ruark, Raffin, 1988). The use of Do Not Resuscitate (DNR) has become common place in hospitals. Nurses are responsible for caring for patients who do not want to or will not be resuscitated. The purpose of this study was to determine the common characteristics of hospitalized Do Not Resuscitate patients who did not survive hospitalization. In addition to determining the kinds of patients who become DNR patients, the reasons DNR orders were written and who was involved in the DNR decision making were also explored. The research questions investigated were: (1) What were the characteristics of hospitalized Do Not Resuscitate patients who did not survive? (2) What were the reasons for the DNR order? (3) Who were the participants in making the decision not to resuscitate?



The medical records of 50 patients, who had Do Not Resuscitate (DNR) orders prior to their death, were examined to determine common characteristics. It was found that DNR patients were elderly, white, married, on Medicare, and entered the hospital from home. Most had a poor prognosis and were not alert on admission or at the time the DNR order was written. Poor chance of survival was the most common reason for the DNR order. The decision not to resuscitate was made by family members most often and by patients infrequently. The average length of stay prior to the DNR order was 7 days. Half of the DNR patients were admitted to the intensive care unit at some point during their hospital stay. Life support withdrawal and resuscitation attempts occurred on patients with DNR orders. Medical therapeutic intervention used by these patients ranged from minimal supportive care to maximal intensive care. The use of 23 medical and nursing interventions were examined at three intervals to determine if the care of the patients was altered by the DNR order. Although the use of oxygen was increased, the use of all other interventions was reduced. Younger (1990) stresses that discussions about the futility of DNR often provide just the opportunity to help patients and families better cope with the inevitability of impending death. Future research should focus on investigating whether nurses can better care for this patient population if they understand the common characteristics of patients with DNR orders.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCharacteristics of do not resuscitate patients who did not survive hospitalizationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149295-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Characteristics of do not resuscitate patients who did not survive hospitalization</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1991</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Fiamingo, Janet, MSN/MN/MNSc/MNE</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">The Tampa General Hospital</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Education Coordinator</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Lives of patients who might otherwise not survive are being prolonged through the use of resuscitative techniques, emergency drugs and other specialized equipment. The quality of life of these patients is not necessarily maintained or enhanced (Ruark, Raffin, 1988). The use of Do Not Resuscitate (DNR) has become common place in hospitals. Nurses are responsible for caring for patients who do not want to or will not be resuscitated. The purpose of this study was to determine the common characteristics of hospitalized Do Not Resuscitate patients who did not survive hospitalization. In addition to determining the kinds of patients who become DNR patients, the reasons DNR orders were written and who was involved in the DNR decision making were also explored. The research questions investigated were: (1) What were the characteristics of hospitalized Do Not Resuscitate patients who did not survive? (2) What were the reasons for the DNR order? (3) Who were the participants in making the decision not to resuscitate?<br/><br/><br/><br/>The medical records of 50 patients, who had Do Not Resuscitate (DNR) orders prior to their death, were examined to determine common characteristics. It was found that DNR patients were elderly, white, married, on Medicare, and entered the hospital from home. Most had a poor prognosis and were not alert on admission or at the time the DNR order was written. Poor chance of survival was the most common reason for the DNR order. The decision not to resuscitate was made by family members most often and by patients infrequently. The average length of stay prior to the DNR order was 7 days. Half of the DNR patients were admitted to the intensive care unit at some point during their hospital stay. Life support withdrawal and resuscitation attempts occurred on patients with DNR orders. Medical therapeutic intervention used by these patients ranged from minimal supportive care to maximal intensive care. The use of 23 medical and nursing interventions were examined at three intervals to determine if the care of the patients was altered by the DNR order. Although the use of oxygen was increased, the use of all other interventions was reduced. Younger (1990) stresses that discussions about the futility of DNR often provide just the opportunity to help patients and families better cope with the inevitability of impending death. Future research should focus on investigating whether nurses can better care for this patient population if they understand the common characteristics of patients with DNR orders.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:59:38Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:59:38Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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