ComputerLink: Electronic home care nursing for persons living with AIDS

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149299
Type:
Presentation
Title:
ComputerLink: Electronic home care nursing for persons living with AIDS
Abstract:
ComputerLink: Electronic home care nursing for persons living with AIDS
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:1991
Author:Brennan, Patricia, PhD, FACMI
P.I. Institution Name:University of Wisconsin-Madison
Title:Moehlman Bascom Professor
Computer technology, well recognized as essential to the managementof nursing information, also has great potential for direct patientcare. Nurses can effectively use computer networks to reachpatients who are isolated due to illness, disability, or socialchoice. To test the effectiveness of a computer network indelivering nursing care to home-based persons living with AIDS(PLWAs), a six month randomized field experiment was conducted.Rogers' Diffusion of Innovation Theory guided the investigation.Rogers' theory predicts that the acceptability of an innovationdepends in part on individuals ability to try out the system as itis supposed to be used. Computer systems have been used to delivereducational information to patients, and to help clinicians managerecords. In this paper we report the results of a field trial ofa nurse-managed computer network designed to support patients athome.The computer network project, known as ComputerLink, supportedPLWAs in managing self-care in the home. The ComputerLink hasthree functional components: a communications network, a decisionsupport module, and an electronic encyclopedia. PLWAs accessed theComputerLink via terminals placed in their homes. ComputerLink wasavailable 24 hours a day, and PLWAs could use it as often asdesired without any charge. Fifty-seven PLWAs (53 men, 4 women;mean age 33.2 years; sd 9.0) were randomly assigned to ComputerLinkor a placebo telephone-based support. Research nurses placed aWyse 30 terminal and modem in the homes of subjects in theexperimental ComputerLink group. Subjects in the placebo groupreceived a monthly telephone call from research nurses.Twenty-nine ComputerLink systems were installed; 25 subjectscompleted the entire six-month study protocol. Two subjects movedout of state during the experiment, one died, and one subject couldnot be located. Forty-five percent of the subjects put thecomputer terminal in the bedroom, 17 percent in the kitchen, and theremainder placed the terminals in the living room, dining room orspare room. Subjects logged into the ComputerLink on over 9200occasions. All participants in the experimental group used thecomputer system at least once; three subjects logged in over 800times. The median number of logins per person was 139, with arange of 2 to 1423. Subjects used all areas of the ComputerLink;the communication area received the greatest proportion ofattention. A clinical nurse logged into the system daily tomonitor public bulletin board communication and to answer anyquestions that were posed. Five hundred and sixty messages wereposted in the public bulletin board; sixty-two questions were askedof the nurse.The experiment reported here demonstrated that the ComputerLinksatisfied subjects' needs to try out a new innovation, and portendsthe success of electronically-based nursing interventions for homecare.The research was supported by a grant from the National Center forNursing Research, R01 20001. L Kelley, M. Bender and D. Seefeldtcontributed to its success.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleComputerLink: Electronic home care nursing for persons living with AIDSen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149299-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">ComputerLink: Electronic home care nursing for persons living with AIDS</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1991</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Brennan, Patricia, PhD, FACMI</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Wisconsin-Madison</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Moehlman Bascom Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">pbrennan@engr.wisc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Computer technology, well recognized as essential to the managementof nursing information, also has great potential for direct patientcare. Nurses can effectively use computer networks to reachpatients who are isolated due to illness, disability, or socialchoice. To test the effectiveness of a computer network indelivering nursing care to home-based persons living with AIDS(PLWAs), a six month randomized field experiment was conducted.Rogers' Diffusion of Innovation Theory guided the investigation.Rogers' theory predicts that the acceptability of an innovationdepends in part on individuals ability to try out the system as itis supposed to be used. Computer systems have been used to delivereducational information to patients, and to help clinicians managerecords. In this paper we report the results of a field trial ofa nurse-managed computer network designed to support patients athome.The computer network project, known as ComputerLink, supportedPLWAs in managing self-care in the home. The ComputerLink hasthree functional components: a communications network, a decisionsupport module, and an electronic encyclopedia. PLWAs accessed theComputerLink via terminals placed in their homes. ComputerLink wasavailable 24 hours a day, and PLWAs could use it as often asdesired without any charge. Fifty-seven PLWAs (53 men, 4 women;mean age 33.2 years; sd 9.0) were randomly assigned to ComputerLinkor a placebo telephone-based support. Research nurses placed aWyse 30 terminal and modem in the homes of subjects in theexperimental ComputerLink group. Subjects in the placebo groupreceived a monthly telephone call from research nurses.Twenty-nine ComputerLink systems were installed; 25 subjectscompleted the entire six-month study protocol. Two subjects movedout of state during the experiment, one died, and one subject couldnot be located. Forty-five percent of the subjects put thecomputer terminal in the bedroom, 17 percent in the kitchen, and theremainder placed the terminals in the living room, dining room orspare room. Subjects logged into the ComputerLink on over 9200occasions. All participants in the experimental group used thecomputer system at least once; three subjects logged in over 800times. The median number of logins per person was 139, with arange of 2 to 1423. Subjects used all areas of the ComputerLink;the communication area received the greatest proportion ofattention. A clinical nurse logged into the system daily tomonitor public bulletin board communication and to answer anyquestions that were posed. Five hundred and sixty messages wereposted in the public bulletin board; sixty-two questions were askedof the nurse.The experiment reported here demonstrated that the ComputerLinksatisfied subjects' needs to try out a new innovation, and portendsthe success of electronically-based nursing interventions for homecare.The research was supported by a grant from the National Center forNursing Research, R01 20001. L Kelley, M. Bender and D. Seefeldtcontributed to its success.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:59:42Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:59:42Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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