Physiologic response of preterm infants during early initiation of breastfeeding (DISS)

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149301
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Physiologic response of preterm infants during early initiation of breastfeeding (DISS)
Abstract:
Physiologic response of preterm infants during early initiation of breastfeeding (DISS)
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:1991
Author:Snell, B.J., PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Southern California
Title:
The clinical assumption that breastfeeding, in comparison to bottlefeeding, places an increased demand for energy on the preterm infant has not been substantiated in the literature. This study examined the physiologic responses of preterm infants during the early initiation of breastfeeding versus bottlefeeding.



The convenience sample consisted of 10 preterm infants hospitalized in a neonatal intensive care unit, whose mothers planned to breastfeed. Following recruitment the mothers were loaned an electric breast pump for initiation and maintenance of milk supply. The infants' mean age at birth was 30.3 weeks (SD=1.418, range=27-32 weeks) with a mean birth weight of 1431.5 gms (SD=247.353, range 975-1750 gms). Four were female and six were male. Four infants were delivered vaginally with six delivered by cesarean section. Seven of the infants were ventilator dependent in the first 24 hours of life.



The methodology involved an alternating treatment, repeated measures design. Each infant was observed for a total of 6 feedings, 3 breastfeedings and 3 bottlefeedings, during the first two weeks of suckled feedings. For purposes of this study, breastfeeding was initiated within 48 hours of the initial order to bottlefeed. Infants were monitored using pulse oximetry, heart rate, and skin temperature during prefeeding, feeding, and postfeeding periods. Behavioral state was assessed before and after the feedings using the Anderson Behavioral State Scale. In addition, the infants are weighed before and after the feedings.



There were no statistically significant differences found in pulse oximetry, heart rate or weight gain analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA. Analysis of infant temperature demonstrated a significant interaction effect between time periods and methods (F-14.252, df 2,18, p=0.0044). Further analysis demonstrated a significant difference from prefeeding to feeding, and prefeeding to postfeeding periods during breastfeedings. Mean infant behavioral state decreased significantly from prefeeding to postfeeding periods (F=23.301. df 1,9, p<.001).



In summary, the findings suggest that early breastfeeding does not place the preterm infant at risk for physiologic destabilization. It appears that breastfeeding keeps infants warmer during feeding and the period immediately after feeding. Further, preterm infants do engage in nutritive sucking during early breastfeeding. The current practice of delaying breastfeeding based on the assumption of physiologic destabilization is not supported by this research.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePhysiologic response of preterm infants during early initiation of breastfeeding (DISS)en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149301-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Physiologic response of preterm infants during early initiation of breastfeeding (DISS)</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1991</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Snell, B.J., PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Southern California</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value"> </td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">bjsnell@uci.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The clinical assumption that breastfeeding, in comparison to bottlefeeding, places an increased demand for energy on the preterm infant has not been substantiated in the literature. This study examined the physiologic responses of preterm infants during the early initiation of breastfeeding versus bottlefeeding.<br/><br/><br/><br/>The convenience sample consisted of 10 preterm infants hospitalized in a neonatal intensive care unit, whose mothers planned to breastfeed. Following recruitment the mothers were loaned an electric breast pump for initiation and maintenance of milk supply. The infants' mean age at birth was 30.3 weeks (SD=1.418, range=27-32 weeks) with a mean birth weight of 1431.5 gms (SD=247.353, range 975-1750 gms). Four were female and six were male. Four infants were delivered vaginally with six delivered by cesarean section. Seven of the infants were ventilator dependent in the first 24 hours of life.<br/><br/><br/><br/>The methodology involved an alternating treatment, repeated measures design. Each infant was observed for a total of 6 feedings, 3 breastfeedings and 3 bottlefeedings, during the first two weeks of suckled feedings. For purposes of this study, breastfeeding was initiated within 48 hours of the initial order to bottlefeed. Infants were monitored using pulse oximetry, heart rate, and skin temperature during prefeeding, feeding, and postfeeding periods. Behavioral state was assessed before and after the feedings using the Anderson Behavioral State Scale. In addition, the infants are weighed before and after the feedings.<br/><br/><br/><br/>There were no statistically significant differences found in pulse oximetry, heart rate or weight gain analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA. Analysis of infant temperature demonstrated a significant interaction effect between time periods and methods (F-14.252, df 2,18, p=0.0044). Further analysis demonstrated a significant difference from prefeeding to feeding, and prefeeding to postfeeding periods during breastfeedings. Mean infant behavioral state decreased significantly from prefeeding to postfeeding periods (F=23.301. df 1,9, p&lt;.001).<br/><br/><br/><br/>In summary, the findings suggest that early breastfeeding does not place the preterm infant at risk for physiologic destabilization. It appears that breastfeeding keeps infants warmer during feeding and the period immediately after feeding. Further, preterm infants do engage in nutritive sucking during early breastfeeding. The current practice of delaying breastfeeding based on the assumption of physiologic destabilization is not supported by this research.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:59:45Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:59:45Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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