Health-related hardiness: Its association with physiologic and psychosocial adaptation to coronary artery disease

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149302
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Health-related hardiness: Its association with physiologic and psychosocial adaptation to coronary artery disease
Abstract:
Health-related hardiness: Its association with physiologic and psychosocial adaptation to coronary artery disease
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:1991
Author:Tipple, Susan, MSN/MN/MNSc/MNE
P.I. Institution Name:University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics
Title:CNS/Surgical Nursing Department
This investigation examined the relationship between the level of

health-related hardiness and physiological and psychosocial

adaptation of individuals diagnosed with coronary artery disease

(CAD) post cardiac event. It is essential that we determine those

factors that maximize physiologic and psychosocial adaptation to

chronic illness, not only for the well-being of the individual but

for the impact that chronic illness has on the cost of health care.



The conceptual framework used for this study was Antonovsky's

Salutogenic Model of Health. This framework focuses on the study

of health, or how people manage to stay healthy despite omnipresent

stressors, as opposed to the study of why people develop a

particular disease. Similarly, this study is based on the need to

identify those factors that promote the process of adaptation

versus maladaptation to a chronic illness, such as coronary artery

disease.



The research hypotheses investigated were:

I. Adults who have high health-related hardiness (low HRHS

scores), will have high physiologic adaptation (high PACAD scores).

II. Adults who have high health-related hardiness (low HRHS

scores), will have high psychosocial adaptation (low PAIS-SR

scores).

III. Adults who have high physiologic adaptation (high PACAD

scores), will high psychosocial adaptation (low PAIS-SR scores).



Data collection instruments used included: Health-Related Hardiness

Scale (HRHS) developed by Pollock (1986) to measure the hardiness

characteristic in the chronically ill; Physiologic Adaptation to

Coronary Artery Disease Scale (PACAD), developed by the researcher

to measure physiologic adaptation; and Psychosocial Adjustment to

Illness Survey, self-report version (PAIS-SR), developed by

Derogatis (1986) and used to measure psychosocial adaptation.



The sample consisted of 46 subjects who were post cardiac event and

referred to New Heart Inc. cardiac rehabilitation program from

March, 1988 to March 1990. Fifteen (33%) were currently

participating and 31(67%) were not participating in the cardiac

rehabilitation program. Among the 46 subjects there were 13(28%)

MI's, 8(17%) PTCA's, 22(48%) CABG, and 3(7%) heart transplants.



The data were analyzed using measures of central tendency,

frequency distribution, Pearson product moment correlation, and

two-sample t-tests. Hypothesis II, adults who have high

health-related hardiness (low HRHS scores) will have high

psychosocial adaptation (low PAIS-SR scores), was supported. A

significant low positive linear relationship existed between HRH

and psychosocial adaptation to coronary artery disease (r=.31;

p<.025). Results of the two sample t-tests revealed that there was

a significant difference (t=2.03; p<.05) in the mean PACAD scores

of 40.67 (SD=5.75) and 36.04 (SD=7.82) between the participants and

non-participants, respectively, with participants having higher

(more) physiologic adaptation. The results of this study suggest

that health-related hardiness may have potential value in

understanding psychosocial adaptation to coronary artery disease

and participation in a structured cardiac rehabilitation program

may facilitate physiologic adaptation.



Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHealth-related hardiness: Its association with physiologic and psychosocial adaptation to coronary artery diseaseen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149302-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Health-related hardiness: Its association with physiologic and psychosocial adaptation to coronary artery disease</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1991</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Tipple, Susan, MSN/MN/MNSc/MNE</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">CNS/Surgical Nursing Department</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">This investigation examined the relationship between the level of<br/><br/>health-related hardiness and physiological and psychosocial<br/><br/>adaptation of individuals diagnosed with coronary artery disease<br/><br/>(CAD) post cardiac event. It is essential that we determine those<br/><br/>factors that maximize physiologic and psychosocial adaptation to<br/><br/>chronic illness, not only for the well-being of the individual but<br/><br/>for the impact that chronic illness has on the cost of health care.<br/><br/><br/><br/>The conceptual framework used for this study was Antonovsky's<br/><br/>Salutogenic Model of Health. This framework focuses on the study<br/><br/>of health, or how people manage to stay healthy despite omnipresent<br/><br/>stressors, as opposed to the study of why people develop a<br/><br/>particular disease. Similarly, this study is based on the need to<br/><br/>identify those factors that promote the process of adaptation<br/><br/>versus maladaptation to a chronic illness, such as coronary artery<br/><br/>disease.<br/><br/><br/><br/>The research hypotheses investigated were:<br/><br/>I. Adults who have high health-related hardiness (low HRHS<br/><br/>scores), will have high physiologic adaptation (high PACAD scores).<br/><br/>II. Adults who have high health-related hardiness (low HRHS<br/><br/>scores), will have high psychosocial adaptation (low PAIS-SR<br/><br/>scores).<br/><br/>III. Adults who have high physiologic adaptation (high PACAD<br/><br/>scores), will high psychosocial adaptation (low PAIS-SR scores).<br/><br/><br/><br/>Data collection instruments used included: Health-Related Hardiness<br/><br/>Scale (HRHS) developed by Pollock (1986) to measure the hardiness<br/><br/>characteristic in the chronically ill; Physiologic Adaptation to<br/><br/>Coronary Artery Disease Scale (PACAD), developed by the researcher<br/><br/>to measure physiologic adaptation; and Psychosocial Adjustment to<br/><br/>Illness Survey, self-report version (PAIS-SR), developed by<br/><br/>Derogatis (1986) and used to measure psychosocial adaptation.<br/><br/><br/><br/>The sample consisted of 46 subjects who were post cardiac event and<br/><br/>referred to New Heart Inc. cardiac rehabilitation program from<br/><br/>March, 1988 to March 1990. Fifteen (33%) were currently<br/><br/>participating and 31(67%) were not participating in the cardiac<br/><br/>rehabilitation program. Among the 46 subjects there were 13(28%)<br/><br/>MI's, 8(17%) PTCA's, 22(48%) CABG, and 3(7%) heart transplants.<br/><br/><br/><br/>The data were analyzed using measures of central tendency,<br/><br/>frequency distribution, Pearson product moment correlation, and<br/><br/>two-sample t-tests. Hypothesis II, adults who have high<br/><br/>health-related hardiness (low HRHS scores) will have high<br/><br/>psychosocial adaptation (low PAIS-SR scores), was supported. A<br/><br/>significant low positive linear relationship existed between HRH<br/><br/>and psychosocial adaptation to coronary artery disease (r=.31;<br/><br/>p&lt;.025). Results of the two sample t-tests revealed that there was<br/><br/>a significant difference (t=2.03; p&lt;.05) in the mean PACAD scores<br/><br/>of 40.67 (SD=5.75) and 36.04 (SD=7.82) between the participants and<br/><br/>non-participants, respectively, with participants having higher<br/><br/>(more) physiologic adaptation. The results of this study suggest<br/><br/>that health-related hardiness may have potential value in<br/><br/>understanding psychosocial adaptation to coronary artery disease<br/><br/>and participation in a structured cardiac rehabilitation program<br/><br/>may facilitate physiologic adaptation.<br/><br/><br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:59:46Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:59:46Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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