2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149304
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Sound in the NICU and its effects on early preterm infants
Abstract:
Sound in the NICU and its effects on early preterm infants
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:1991
Author:Gamblian, Vivian, MSN/MN/MNSc/MNE
P.I. Institution Name:University of Cincinnati
Title:OB Short Stay Program Coordinator
Problem: The study (funded by American Nurses Foundation) is an early phase to establish a knowledge base for planning nursing strategies to prevent the possible detrimental effects of noise to preterm infants.



Research Questions: The purpose is to document the sound levels to which preterm infants are exposed during their early weeks in the Level III Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. Also the study will determine the effects of elevated noise on selected responses of preterm infants. The projected therapeutic hypothesis is that decreasing/interrupting the input (sound) will lessen energy draining infant physiological and behavioral responses.



Theoretical Relevance/Literature Review: The theoretical rationale derives from our knowledge base on how the human organism receives, processes, and responds to auditory stimuli (Cantrell, 1979). For purposes of our research, the independent variable is the physical environmental phenomenon of noise, specifically the patterns present in Level III NICUs. The intervening variables are embedded in the physical pathway along which the airwaves/sound waves are transmitted to the human brain which sends forth the stimuli for behavioral responses. The physical pathway includes the auditory canal (which in some newborns contains fluid), tympanic membrane, ossicles, fenestra vestibuli, fluid in the labyrinth, spiral organ of corti, terminal filaments of the cochlear branch of the vestibulocochlear (8th cranial) nerve which is the pathway to the temporal lobe of the cerebral cortex of the brain. In the brain, autonomic and sympathetic responses are triggered leading to the dependent variables consisting of both physiological and behavioral responses. The projected therapeutic hypothesis is that decreasing or interrupting the input (less noise or barriers to the noise) will lessen energy draining (negative) infant physiological and behavioral responses. While effects of noise in hospital environments are being studied, the specifics of the NICU environment have received less attention (Als et al., 1986; Long et al., 1980). Further the data from the 1970s should which differ from todays data because of changes in the population and equipment in Level III NICUs (Falk and Wood, 1973; Lawson, Daum, and Tukewitz, 1977; Peltz et al., 1970).



Design: A on-group descriptive study of environmental, behavioral, and physiological parameters for infants in NICU will be measured.



Sample: Phase II, a convenience sample of twenty infants born at 28 to 30 weeks gestation will be studied for 24 hours each. The infants will be studied between 7 and 21 days of postnatal age.



Data Collection: Phase I, in-vitro measurements of ambient noise were taken for 168 continuous hours both intra-incubator and external to incubator prior to beginning the in-vivo study. In Phase II, the measures will include Q 10 Sec. measures of sound pressure levels in conjunction with infant physiological measures of heart rate, respiratory rate, and oxygen saturation. Continuous observation will assist in validating the source of the sound in relation to the nursing care being given to the infant and in addition capture the behavioral responses assumed to be associated with the added noise. Findings: Preliminary findings on in-vitro measurements found the following decibel levels: INSIDE-51 to 57 (SD=0.69), OUTSIDE-76 to 50 (SD=3.97), and DIFFERENCE-18 to -2. Further data analysis planned for completion by August, 1991.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSound in the NICU and its effects on early preterm infantsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149304-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Sound in the NICU and its effects on early preterm infants</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1991</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Gamblian, Vivian, MSN/MN/MNSc/MNE</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Cincinnati</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">OB Short Stay Program Coordinator</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value"> </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Problem: The study (funded by American Nurses Foundation) is an early phase to establish a knowledge base for planning nursing strategies to prevent the possible detrimental effects of noise to preterm infants.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Research Questions: The purpose is to document the sound levels to which preterm infants are exposed during their early weeks in the Level III Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. Also the study will determine the effects of elevated noise on selected responses of preterm infants. The projected therapeutic hypothesis is that decreasing/interrupting the input (sound) will lessen energy draining infant physiological and behavioral responses.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Theoretical Relevance/Literature Review: The theoretical rationale derives from our knowledge base on how the human organism receives, processes, and responds to auditory stimuli (Cantrell, 1979). For purposes of our research, the independent variable is the physical environmental phenomenon of noise, specifically the patterns present in Level III NICUs. The intervening variables are embedded in the physical pathway along which the airwaves/sound waves are transmitted to the human brain which sends forth the stimuli for behavioral responses. The physical pathway includes the auditory canal (which in some newborns contains fluid), tympanic membrane, ossicles, fenestra vestibuli, fluid in the labyrinth, spiral organ of corti, terminal filaments of the cochlear branch of the vestibulocochlear (8th cranial) nerve which is the pathway to the temporal lobe of the cerebral cortex of the brain. In the brain, autonomic and sympathetic responses are triggered leading to the dependent variables consisting of both physiological and behavioral responses. The projected therapeutic hypothesis is that decreasing or interrupting the input (less noise or barriers to the noise) will lessen energy draining (negative) infant physiological and behavioral responses. While effects of noise in hospital environments are being studied, the specifics of the NICU environment have received less attention (Als et al., 1986; Long et al., 1980). Further the data from the 1970s should which differ from todays data because of changes in the population and equipment in Level III NICUs (Falk and Wood, 1973; Lawson, Daum, and Tukewitz, 1977; Peltz et al., 1970).<br/><br/><br/><br/>Design: A on-group descriptive study of environmental, behavioral, and physiological parameters for infants in NICU will be measured.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Sample: Phase II, a convenience sample of twenty infants born at 28 to 30 weeks gestation will be studied for 24 hours each. The infants will be studied between 7 and 21 days of postnatal age.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Data Collection: Phase I, in-vitro measurements of ambient noise were taken for 168 continuous hours both intra-incubator and external to incubator prior to beginning the in-vivo study. In Phase II, the measures will include Q 10 Sec. measures of sound pressure levels in conjunction with infant physiological measures of heart rate, respiratory rate, and oxygen saturation. Continuous observation will assist in validating the source of the sound in relation to the nursing care being given to the infant and in addition capture the behavioral responses assumed to be associated with the added noise. Findings: Preliminary findings on in-vitro measurements found the following decibel levels: INSIDE-51 to 57 (SD=0.69), OUTSIDE-76 to 50 (SD=3.97), and DIFFERENCE-18 to -2. Further data analysis planned for completion by August, 1991.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:59:48Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:59:48Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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