2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149306
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nursing faculty and student attitudes related to HIV
Abstract:
Nursing faculty and student attitudes related to HIV
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:1991
Author:Cerny, Jo, MSN/MN/MNSc/MNE
P.I. Institution Name:University of Hawaii
School of Nursing
Title:Assistant Professor
Nursing educators need to know more about students' attitudes about

HIV-related topics if they intend to address and modify negative

attitudes which might interfere with optimal care. Prior research

has examined nursing student's attitudes and attitude change and

points to the need for further instruction related to HIV is

recommended. However, no study has yet compared student and

faculty attitudes.



These results indicate that nursing faculty need to realize that

students hold less positive attitudes about topics/people related

to HIV and that the graduate students are a bit more positive than

undergraduates. Nursing educators might also expect a reduction in

AIDS work related stress over time, but other important attitudes

and intentions are not likely to change without specific

educational interventions.



This paper describes a multi-dimensional survey administered to

students and nursing faculty regarding their attitudes about

HIV-related topics. It was hypothesized that level of training

would relate to attitudes held. It was also hypothesized that

these attitudes would be generally stable across time, without

specific interventions to address these feelings.



Respondents included 110 undergraduate, 36 graduate students and 25

nursing faculty. All of the first year undergraduate students

(N=55) completed an identical survey one year later. The 66-item

scale consisted of subscales measuring AIDS-phobia, AIDS-work

stress, attitudes toward homosexuality, and toward IV drug users,

intentions to work with a) homosexual, b) IV drug using and c) AIDS

patients, and a measure of social desirability (from the

Marlow-Crowne SDS).



A series of Analyses of Variance on the first set of data indicated

strong and consistent differences across groups of respondents.

Across every scale (except the social desirability measure) nursing

faculty held the most positive attitudes or behavioral intentions,

followed by the graduate nursing students, then by the

undergraduate students. These patterns were statistically

significant (p-values) between .02 to .001) except for the

behavioral intentions to work with IV drug users (p<.30).



Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNursing faculty and student attitudes related to HIVen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149306-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Nursing faculty and student attitudes related to HIV</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1991</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Cerny, Jo, MSN/MN/MNSc/MNE</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Hawaii<br/>School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Nursing educators need to know more about students' attitudes about<br/><br/>HIV-related topics if they intend to address and modify negative<br/><br/>attitudes which might interfere with optimal care. Prior research<br/><br/>has examined nursing student's attitudes and attitude change and<br/><br/>points to the need for further instruction related to HIV is<br/><br/>recommended. However, no study has yet compared student and<br/><br/>faculty attitudes.<br/><br/><br/><br/>These results indicate that nursing faculty need to realize that<br/><br/>students hold less positive attitudes about topics/people related<br/><br/>to HIV and that the graduate students are a bit more positive than<br/><br/>undergraduates. Nursing educators might also expect a reduction in<br/><br/>AIDS work related stress over time, but other important attitudes<br/><br/>and intentions are not likely to change without specific<br/><br/>educational interventions.<br/><br/><br/><br/>This paper describes a multi-dimensional survey administered to<br/><br/>students and nursing faculty regarding their attitudes about<br/><br/>HIV-related topics. It was hypothesized that level of training<br/><br/>would relate to attitudes held. It was also hypothesized that<br/><br/>these attitudes would be generally stable across time, without<br/><br/>specific interventions to address these feelings.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Respondents included 110 undergraduate, 36 graduate students and 25<br/><br/>nursing faculty. All of the first year undergraduate students<br/><br/>(N=55) completed an identical survey one year later. The 66-item<br/><br/>scale consisted of subscales measuring AIDS-phobia, AIDS-work<br/><br/>stress, attitudes toward homosexuality, and toward IV drug users,<br/><br/>intentions to work with a) homosexual, b) IV drug using and c) AIDS<br/><br/>patients, and a measure of social desirability (from the<br/><br/>Marlow-Crowne SDS).<br/><br/><br/><br/>A series of Analyses of Variance on the first set of data indicated<br/><br/>strong and consistent differences across groups of respondents.<br/><br/>Across every scale (except the social desirability measure) nursing<br/><br/>faculty held the most positive attitudes or behavioral intentions,<br/><br/>followed by the graduate nursing students, then by the<br/><br/>undergraduate students. These patterns were statistically<br/><br/>significant (p-values) between .02 to .001) except for the<br/><br/>behavioral intentions to work with IV drug users (p&lt;.30).<br/><br/><br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:59:50Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:59:50Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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