2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149307
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Patients' perceptions of infertility treatment
Abstract:
Patients' perceptions of infertility treatment
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:1991
Author:Blenner, Janet, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:San Diego State University
Title:Full Professor
Advances in infertility medicine and technology during the past

decade have facilitated more definitive diagnoses and increased

chances of conception. However, they also require patients to

engage in rigorous and prolonged treatment. An understanding of

how patients perceive and manage rigorous treatment demands in

interaction with the health care system will make it possible to

provide better and more responsive care. A qualitative study using

unstructured open-ended interviews and content analysis was used

for the purpose of describing infertility treatment from the

patient's perspective. Indepth cojoint interviews were conducted

of 25 infertile couples, selected by qualitative purposeful

(theoretical) sampling and covering the full range of infertility

etiologies and treatments. Credibility and transferability were

used to ensure rigor of the data analysis.



Patients perceived treatment exigencies such as the performance of

regimens and the critical timeliness of procedures as leading to

feelings of subjugation to health providers, performance anxiety,

and coitus as a clinical chore. Expenditures of time, energy, and

finances depleted their ability to meet treatment demands. All of

these exigencies placed significant stress on couples' lives. This

stress was mediated by professionals' competency and sensitivity

and the environmental comfort of the treatment setting. While

positive experiences decreased stress, negative perceptions of

these mediators such as professional insensitivity or incompetence

increased patient stress. In addition, spouses individually or

collectively developed the action strategies of buffering,

playing the system, spousal advocating, and physician

shopping and used the mental strategies of hope,

temporalizing, and having no regrets which helped mitigate the

stress. High stress and lack of hope of pregnancy led to

termination of treatment. Descriptions presented will be of those

aspects of treatment which are most taxing of patients' resources

and most disruptive of their lives. Practical suggestions will be

given for more sensitive rendering of care, for decreasing demands

on patients, and for creating environmental changes that will make

treatment settings more condusive to the needs of the infertile.



This study was funded by a Sigma Theta Tau International Research

Grant 1988.



Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePatients' perceptions of infertility treatmenten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149307-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Patients' perceptions of infertility treatment</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1991</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Blenner, Janet, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">San Diego State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Full Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Advances in infertility medicine and technology during the past<br/><br/>decade have facilitated more definitive diagnoses and increased<br/><br/>chances of conception. However, they also require patients to<br/><br/>engage in rigorous and prolonged treatment. An understanding of<br/><br/>how patients perceive and manage rigorous treatment demands in<br/><br/>interaction with the health care system will make it possible to<br/><br/>provide better and more responsive care. A qualitative study using<br/><br/>unstructured open-ended interviews and content analysis was used<br/><br/>for the purpose of describing infertility treatment from the<br/><br/>patient's perspective. Indepth cojoint interviews were conducted<br/><br/>of 25 infertile couples, selected by qualitative purposeful<br/><br/>(theoretical) sampling and covering the full range of infertility<br/><br/>etiologies and treatments. Credibility and transferability were<br/><br/>used to ensure rigor of the data analysis.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Patients perceived treatment exigencies such as the performance of<br/><br/>regimens and the critical timeliness of procedures as leading to<br/><br/>feelings of subjugation to health providers, performance anxiety,<br/><br/>and coitus as a clinical chore. Expenditures of time, energy, and<br/><br/>finances depleted their ability to meet treatment demands. All of<br/><br/>these exigencies placed significant stress on couples' lives. This<br/><br/>stress was mediated by professionals' competency and sensitivity<br/><br/>and the environmental comfort of the treatment setting. While<br/><br/>positive experiences decreased stress, negative perceptions of<br/><br/>these mediators such as professional insensitivity or incompetence<br/><br/>increased patient stress. In addition, spouses individually or<br/><br/>collectively developed the action strategies of buffering,<br/><br/>playing the system, spousal advocating, and physician<br/><br/>shopping and used the mental strategies of hope,<br/><br/>temporalizing, and having no regrets which helped mitigate the<br/><br/>stress. High stress and lack of hope of pregnancy led to<br/><br/>termination of treatment. Descriptions presented will be of those<br/><br/>aspects of treatment which are most taxing of patients' resources<br/><br/>and most disruptive of their lives. Practical suggestions will be<br/><br/>given for more sensitive rendering of care, for decreasing demands<br/><br/>on patients, and for creating environmental changes that will make<br/><br/>treatment settings more condusive to the needs of the infertile.<br/><br/><br/><br/>This study was funded by a Sigma Theta Tau International Research<br/><br/>Grant 1988.<br/><br/><br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:59:52Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:59:52Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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