Oxygen saturation of children in sleep and wake states at a moderate altitude

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149308
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Oxygen saturation of children in sleep and wake states at a moderate altitude
Abstract:
Oxygen saturation of children in sleep and wake states at a moderate altitude
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:1993
Conference Date:November 30, 1993
Author:Harrison, Karen, MS/MSc
P.I. Institution Name:
Title:
Pulse oximetry is becoming a standard of care during critical care, anesthesia, and post-anesthesia. It provides a quick non-invasive measurement of arterial oxygenation. Few oxygen saturation studies of children, especially children at a moderate altitude, have been published. The purpose of this study was to fill a gap in the literature by documenting oxygen saturation normals for children at a moderate altitude.



A quantitative descriptive study using thirty-two healthy children, age 2-11 years, living at a moderate altitude of 2194 m (7200 ft) was conducted to determine oxygen saturation values (SpO2) while awake and asleep. SpO2 was measured using a Nellcor N-10 pulse oximeter at three separate intervals: awake and quiet, asleep in an observed NREM stage, and asleep in an observed REM stage.



The mean SpO2 for each state was determined using descriptive statistics. Friedman and paired t-test were used to analyze for statistical differences. SpO2 values for the three states showed statistical differences (p=.000). Dividing the group into preschool and schoolage children also demonstrated differences between the three states (p=.001, p=.O23, respectively). The results suggest that sleep affects oxygen saturation levels in children at a moderate altitude with the greatest decrease occurring during REM sleep, and that younger children have higher oxygen saturation levels than older children and adults.



The relationship between sleep, age, altitude, and oxygenation is discussed, especially in relation to metabolic changes, respiratory rate and volume, maturation of the cardiovascular system, sleep patterns, and barometric pressure. Previous studies at moderate altitudes demonstrate a decreased SpO2 during sleep in healthy infants and children. At low altitude, SpO2 briefly decreases in infants while awake or feeding, whereas a 0-2% decrease may be noted in schoolage children and young adults during REM sleep.



The need for further research into normal values for children, especially at varying altitudes, is discussed. Other research questions regarding sleep and SpO2 levels are raised. Clinical implications for the health care provider working at a moderate altitude are stated.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
30-Nov-1993
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleOxygen saturation of children in sleep and wake states at a moderate altitudeen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149308-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Oxygen saturation of children in sleep and wake states at a moderate altitude</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1993</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 30, 1993</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Harrison, Karen, MS/MSc</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value"> </td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value"> </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Pulse oximetry is becoming a standard of care during critical care, anesthesia, and post-anesthesia. It provides a quick non-invasive measurement of arterial oxygenation. Few oxygen saturation studies of children, especially children at a moderate altitude, have been published. The purpose of this study was to fill a gap in the literature by documenting oxygen saturation normals for children at a moderate altitude.<br/><br/><br/><br/>A quantitative descriptive study using thirty-two healthy children, age 2-11 years, living at a moderate altitude of 2194 m (7200 ft) was conducted to determine oxygen saturation values (SpO2) while awake and asleep. SpO2 was measured using a Nellcor N-10 pulse oximeter at three separate intervals: awake and quiet, asleep in an observed NREM stage, and asleep in an observed REM stage.<br/><br/><br/><br/>The mean SpO2 for each state was determined using descriptive statistics. Friedman and paired t-test were used to analyze for statistical differences. SpO2 values for the three states showed statistical differences (p=.000). Dividing the group into preschool and schoolage children also demonstrated differences between the three states (p=.001, p=.O23, respectively). The results suggest that sleep affects oxygen saturation levels in children at a moderate altitude with the greatest decrease occurring during REM sleep, and that younger children have higher oxygen saturation levels than older children and adults.<br/><br/><br/><br/>The relationship between sleep, age, altitude, and oxygenation is discussed, especially in relation to metabolic changes, respiratory rate and volume, maturation of the cardiovascular system, sleep patterns, and barometric pressure. Previous studies at moderate altitudes demonstrate a decreased SpO2 during sleep in healthy infants and children. At low altitude, SpO2 briefly decreases in infants while awake or feeding, whereas a 0-2% decrease may be noted in schoolage children and young adults during REM sleep.<br/><br/><br/><br/>The need for further research into normal values for children, especially at varying altitudes, is discussed. Other research questions regarding sleep and SpO2 levels are raised. Clinical implications for the health care provider working at a moderate altitude are stated.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:59:53Z-
dc.date.issued1993-11-30en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:59:53Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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