The effects of waterbed flotation on indicators of energy expenditure activity level, heart rate, and behavioral state in premature infants (DISS)

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149310
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The effects of waterbed flotation on indicators of energy expenditure activity level, heart rate, and behavioral state in premature infants (DISS)
Abstract:
The effects of waterbed flotation on indicators of energy expenditure activity level, heart rate, and behavioral state in premature infants (DISS)
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:1991
Author:Deiriggi, Pamela, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:West Virginia University School of Nursing
Title:Associate Professor
The purpose of this clinical study is to investigate the effects of

waterbed flotation on heart rate in preterm infants. Waterbed

flotation is compensatory movement stimulatin for preterm infants who experience this utero, but are deprived of it during their

stay in intensive care nurseries. Heart rate, a robust linear

correlate of oxygen consumption in preterm infants, is viewed as an

indicator of energy expenditure. Since waterbeds have been shown

to soothe these infants, it is hypothesized that heart rates will

be lower while infants are on waterbeds compared to when they lie

on standard incubator mattresses. Decreasing heart rate and

thereby energy expenditure through waterbed flotation has

implications for improving weight gains in preterm infants whose

medical conditions are stable, but who remain in intensive care

nurseries to grow.



Subjects were 28 medically stable preterm infants in neonatal nurseries whose

parents consented to allow their infants to participate in the study. Their ages ranged from

29-34 weeks post-conception at the time of the study. Across a 10-day study, HR was

determined for a one-hour period on each day. Baseline HR with infants on the standard

incubator mattress was obtained on the first 2 days. They were then placed on the waterbed

and remained there 4 days. They were returned to the incubator mattress and studied 4

more days. Infants served as their own controls among baseline, on-waterbed and off-waterbed

periods. HR was determined by using a heart rate counting feature of the neonatal

cardio-respiratory monitors. Heart rates were the repeated measures data collected on each

of the 10 days.



Analysis of variance revealed that HR variability among subjects was significant.

There was no difference between baseline HR and on-waterbed HR. Rather, HR increased

when infants were taken off the waterbed. The hypothesis that waterbed flotation would

result in a HR reduction was not supported. The possibility that theophylline acted as a

confounding variable existed because doses were changed and levels varied for some subjects

over the 10 days. Eight infants responded to the waterbed with lower HR during the on-waterbed

period compared to the baseline period (mean reduction=5.7 bpm).



The findings that waterbed flotation did not effect a heart rate reduction and that

heart rate rose when the infants were returned to the incubator mattress are similar to

those of a previous study. Since waterbeds have consistently resulted in soothing effects

such as improved sleep and lowered activity, failure to produce a concomitant reduction in

heart rate warrants attention towards other factors that may be determinants of heart rate.

The high variability within and among subjects raises questions as to the usefulness of the

heart rate variable for determining energy costs.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe effects of waterbed flotation on indicators of energy expenditure activity level, heart rate, and behavioral state in premature infants (DISS)en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149310-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The effects of waterbed flotation on indicators of energy expenditure activity level, heart rate, and behavioral state in premature infants (DISS)</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1991</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Deiriggi, Pamela, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">West Virginia University School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this clinical study is to investigate the effects of<br/><br/>waterbed flotation on heart rate in preterm infants. Waterbed<br/><br/>flotation is compensatory movement stimulatin for preterm infants who experience this utero, but are deprived of it during their<br/><br/>stay in intensive care nurseries. Heart rate, a robust linear<br/><br/>correlate of oxygen consumption in preterm infants, is viewed as an<br/><br/>indicator of energy expenditure. Since waterbeds have been shown<br/><br/>to soothe these infants, it is hypothesized that heart rates will<br/><br/>be lower while infants are on waterbeds compared to when they lie<br/><br/>on standard incubator mattresses. Decreasing heart rate and<br/><br/>thereby energy expenditure through waterbed flotation has<br/><br/>implications for improving weight gains in preterm infants whose<br/><br/>medical conditions are stable, but who remain in intensive care<br/><br/>nurseries to grow.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Subjects were 28 medically stable preterm infants in neonatal nurseries whose<br/><br/>parents consented to allow their infants to participate in the study. Their ages ranged from<br/><br/>29-34 weeks post-conception at the time of the study. Across a 10-day study, HR was<br/><br/>determined for a one-hour period on each day. Baseline HR with infants on the standard<br/><br/>incubator mattress was obtained on the first 2 days. They were then placed on the waterbed<br/><br/>and remained there 4 days. They were returned to the incubator mattress and studied 4<br/><br/>more days. Infants served as their own controls among baseline, on-waterbed and off-waterbed <br/><br/>periods. HR was determined by using a heart rate counting feature of the neonatal<br/><br/>cardio-respiratory monitors. Heart rates were the repeated measures data collected on each<br/><br/>of the 10 days.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Analysis of variance revealed that HR variability among subjects was significant.<br/><br/>There was no difference between baseline HR and on-waterbed HR. Rather, HR increased<br/><br/>when infants were taken off the waterbed. The hypothesis that waterbed flotation would<br/><br/>result in a HR reduction was not supported. The possibility that theophylline acted as a <br/><br/>confounding variable existed because doses were changed and levels varied for some subjects<br/><br/>over the 10 days. Eight infants responded to the waterbed with lower HR during the on-waterbed<br/><br/>period compared to the baseline period (mean reduction=5.7 bpm).<br/><br/><br/><br/>The findings that waterbed flotation did not effect a heart rate reduction and that<br/><br/>heart rate rose when the infants were returned to the incubator mattress are similar to<br/><br/>those of a previous study. Since waterbeds have consistently resulted in soothing effects<br/><br/>such as improved sleep and lowered activity, failure to produce a concomitant reduction in<br/><br/>heart rate warrants attention towards other factors that may be determinants of heart rate.<br/><br/>The high variability within and among subjects raises questions as to the usefulness of the<br/><br/>heart rate variable for determining energy costs.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:59:55Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:59:55Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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