2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149311
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Breastfeeding: Teenagers’ Attitudes and Beliefs
Abstract:
Breastfeeding: Teenagers’ Attitudes and Beliefs
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Schelkoph, Sara
P.I. Institution Name:Altru Health System
Background: Breastfeeding is the recommended method of infant feeding because it is associated with scientifically validated health benefits, yet U.S. breastfeeding initiation and continuation rates continue to lag behind Healthy People goals. Women typically make decisions about infant feeding prior to or early in pregnancy, and their decision is strongly predicted by their own and family member’s attitudes and beliefs about breastfeeding. Little is known about the development of attitudes and beliefs about breastfeeding prior to pregnancy and parenthood. Objectives: The aims of this project were to: 1) describe high school students’ experiences and exposure to breastfeeding; 2) describe high school students’ attitudes and beliefs about breastfeeding; 3) compare gender differences related to breastfeeding attitudes and beliefs; and 4) describe the relationship between student experience and exposure to breastfeeding and their breastfeeding attitudes and beliefs. Design: Descriptive and comparative. Population, Sample, and Setting: The target population was high school sophomores. The sample was a cohort of 96 sophomore high school students enrolled in a health class at a high school in the north central region of the United States. Outcome Variables: Personal breastfeeding experiences, attitudes, and beliefs were measured using the Infant Feeding Experiences Questionnaire and parts of the Minnesota Infant Feeding Questionnaire. Methods: Students were asked to provide data during one regularly scheduled class period. Questionnaires were distributed to the class, completed by the students, and returned to the investigator on the same day. Data were analyzed using numeric and graphical descriptive techniques (questions 1and 2), t?tests (question 3), and correlation coefficients (question 4). Findings: 90.6% of students reported at least one breastfeeding experience, with 5.2% reporting a maximum number of 14 experiences. Attitude regarding breastfeeding and bottle feeding were both regarded favorably, with attitude towards bottle feeding slightly more positive. Personal spaces, such as private homes, were more highly regarded as appropriate settings for breastfeeding than public places, such as restaurants and malls. Male students (19%) were less likely than female students (46.3%) to plan breastfeeding for their future children. Attitudes towards breastfeeding were consistent across gender, while beliefs among females were more positive (p=.001). Breastfeeding attitudes were positively correlated with experiences and exposure to breastfeeding (r=0.292, n=173, p=.001) as were breastfeeding beliefs (r=0.289, n=172, p=.001). Personal experiences such as being breastfed themselves or observing their siblings being breastfed most strongly correlated (p=.001). Conclusions: Teenagers’ attitudes and beliefs regarding breastfeeding reflect those of the community norm. Exposure to and experiences with breastfeeding, especially early and close personal experiences, form the basis of attitudes, beliefs and intent to breastfeed. Number of experiences is also a significant influential factor in the development of beliefs and attitudes regarding breastfeeding. Findings indicate the importance of the opportunity to learn about and observe breastfeeding in the development of future breastfeeding attitudes and beliefs. Implications: Findings can be used to develop, implement and evaluate the school curriculum for opportunities to include breastfeeding as the ideal form of human nutrition to enhance teenagers’ attitudes and beliefs regarding breastfeeding.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBreastfeeding: Teenagers’ Attitudes and Beliefsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149311-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Breastfeeding: Teenagers&rsquo; Attitudes and Beliefs</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Schelkoph, Sara</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Altru Health System</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">schelkoph@hotmail.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Breastfeeding is the recommended method of infant feeding because it is associated with scientifically validated health benefits, yet U.S. breastfeeding initiation and continuation rates continue to lag behind Healthy People goals. Women typically make decisions about infant feeding prior to or early in pregnancy, and their decision is strongly predicted by their own and family member&rsquo;s attitudes and beliefs about breastfeeding. Little is known about the development of attitudes and beliefs about breastfeeding prior to pregnancy and parenthood. Objectives: The aims of this project were to: 1) describe high school students&rsquo; experiences and exposure to breastfeeding; 2) describe high school students&rsquo; attitudes and beliefs about breastfeeding; 3) compare gender differences related to breastfeeding attitudes and beliefs; and 4) describe the relationship between student experience and exposure to breastfeeding and their breastfeeding attitudes and beliefs. Design: Descriptive and comparative. Population, Sample, and Setting: The target population was high school sophomores. The sample was a cohort of 96 sophomore high school students enrolled in a health class at a high school in the north central region of the United States. Outcome Variables: Personal breastfeeding experiences, attitudes, and beliefs were measured using the Infant Feeding Experiences Questionnaire and parts of the Minnesota Infant Feeding Questionnaire. Methods: Students were asked to provide data during one regularly scheduled class period. Questionnaires were distributed to the class, completed by the students, and returned to the investigator on the same day. Data were analyzed using numeric and graphical descriptive techniques (questions 1and 2), t?tests (question 3), and correlation coefficients (question 4). Findings: 90.6% of students reported at least one breastfeeding experience, with 5.2% reporting a maximum number of 14 experiences. Attitude regarding breastfeeding and bottle feeding were both regarded favorably, with attitude towards bottle feeding slightly more positive. Personal spaces, such as private homes, were more highly regarded as appropriate settings for breastfeeding than public places, such as restaurants and malls. Male students (19%) were less likely than female students (46.3%) to plan breastfeeding for their future children. Attitudes towards breastfeeding were consistent across gender, while beliefs among females were more positive (p=.001). Breastfeeding attitudes were positively correlated with experiences and exposure to breastfeeding (r=0.292, n=173, p=.001) as were breastfeeding beliefs (r=0.289, n=172, p=.001). Personal experiences such as being breastfed themselves or observing their siblings being breastfed most strongly correlated (p=.001). Conclusions: Teenagers&rsquo; attitudes and beliefs regarding breastfeeding reflect those of the community norm. Exposure to and experiences with breastfeeding, especially early and close personal experiences, form the basis of attitudes, beliefs and intent to breastfeed. Number of experiences is also a significant influential factor in the development of beliefs and attitudes regarding breastfeeding. Findings indicate the importance of the opportunity to learn about and observe breastfeeding in the development of future breastfeeding attitudes and beliefs. Implications: Findings can be used to develop, implement and evaluate the school curriculum for opportunities to include breastfeeding as the ideal form of human nutrition to enhance teenagers&rsquo; attitudes and beliefs regarding breastfeeding.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:59:56Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:59:56Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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