Relationship between Obesity and Acanthosis Nigricans in Children & Adolescents

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149313
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Relationship between Obesity and Acanthosis Nigricans in Children & Adolescents
Abstract:
Relationship between Obesity and Acanthosis Nigricans in Children & Adolescents
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Valdez, Luis
P.I. Institution Name:Mercy Health Center
Abstract: The prevalence of obesity in children has steadily increased in the United States. Only recently has the link between Acanthosis Nigricians (AN) and obesity in school age children become apparent and a major concern among health care professionals. As obese children mature into adulthood, continuing obesity and insulin resistance pave the way for increased risk of diabetes. Consequently, it is essential for health care professionals who work with children to identify those who are at risk. The purpose of this study was to identify a relationship between AN and obesity in children/adolescents in the effort to assist with pre-diabetic screenings. A retrospective, descriptive, correlational design was utilized in gathering data on Hispanic children and adolescents identified with AN. A convenience sample of 30 charts was selected from a pediatrician’s office in south Texas. Inclusion criteria for the study was a documented diagnosis of AN and age at time AN was diagnosed must not exceed 17 years of age. Data collected included height and weight, fasting insulin level value, fasting cholesterol level value, BMI, and grade of AN. Data was entered into the SPSS 9th edition statistical program. Descriptive statistics were as follows: weight in pounds (lbs) ( M = 148.59, SD = 4.45), height in inches (in) (M=60.22, SD=3.79), age in years (M=11, SD = 1.92), glucose in mg/dl (M = 89.96, SD = 6.37), insulin in uU/ml (M = 27.90, SD = 12.26), BMI (M = 28.84, SD = 4.45), and cholesterol in mg/dl (M = 178.76, SD = 27.48). Of the sample (N=30), 73.3% had abnormal high fasting insulin levels, 70% had a BMI greater than an index of 27, 70% had a cholesterol level greater than 170mg/dl, and 56% had positive family history of diabetes. Analysis of the data revealed a strong Pearson’s correlation between fasting insulin level and grade of AN (r=.73 ; two-tailed p<.01). In addition, analysis further revealed a significant correlation between grade of AN and weight (r=.31 ; one-tailed p<.05). Body Mass Index (BMI) had a strong Pearson’s correlation with weight (r=83 ; two-tailed p<.01) and with percentile range for age and weight (r=.42 ; p<.05). In conclusion, within this group of children there was a significant correlation between AN and hyperinsulinemia, and between subjects with AN and obesity. High insulin and cholesterol levels with obesity increase the risk for metabolic disease. Study limitations included the use of a convenience sample and the small sample size. The results of this study suggests that for this sample of children and adolescence who present both AN and obesity receiving early medical evaluation and treatment may be necessary. Further research should be geared towards replicating the study with a larger random sample and further identification of markers that place children at risk for obesity and insulin resistance.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRelationship between Obesity and Acanthosis Nigricans in Children & Adolescentsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149313-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Relationship between Obesity and Acanthosis Nigricans in Children &amp; Adolescents</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Valdez, Luis</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Mercy Health Center</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">louie_v@hotmail.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Abstract: The prevalence of obesity in children has steadily increased in the United States. Only recently has the link between Acanthosis Nigricians (AN) and obesity in school age children become apparent and a major concern among health care professionals. As obese children mature into adulthood, continuing obesity and insulin resistance pave the way for increased risk of diabetes. Consequently, it is essential for health care professionals who work with children to identify those who are at risk. The purpose of this study was to identify a relationship between AN and obesity in children/adolescents in the effort to assist with pre-diabetic screenings. A retrospective, descriptive, correlational design was utilized in gathering data on Hispanic children and adolescents identified with AN. A convenience sample of 30 charts was selected from a pediatrician&rsquo;s office in south Texas. Inclusion criteria for the study was a documented diagnosis of AN and age at time AN was diagnosed must not exceed 17 years of age. Data collected included height and weight, fasting insulin level value, fasting cholesterol level value, BMI, and grade of AN. Data was entered into the SPSS 9th edition statistical program. Descriptive statistics were as follows: weight in pounds (lbs) ( M = 148.59, SD = 4.45), height in inches (in) (M=60.22, SD=3.79), age in years (M=11, SD = 1.92), glucose in mg/dl (M = 89.96, SD = 6.37), insulin in uU/ml (M = 27.90, SD = 12.26), BMI (M = 28.84, SD = 4.45), and cholesterol in mg/dl (M = 178.76, SD = 27.48). Of the sample (N=30), 73.3% had abnormal high fasting insulin levels, 70% had a BMI greater than an index of 27, 70% had a cholesterol level greater than 170mg/dl, and 56% had positive family history of diabetes. Analysis of the data revealed a strong Pearson&rsquo;s correlation between fasting insulin level and grade of AN (r=.73 ; two-tailed p&lt;.01). In addition, analysis further revealed a significant correlation between grade of AN and weight (r=.31 ; one-tailed p&lt;.05). Body Mass Index (BMI) had a strong Pearson&rsquo;s correlation with weight (r=83 ; two-tailed p&lt;.01) and with percentile range for age and weight (r=.42 ; p&lt;.05). In conclusion, within this group of children there was a significant correlation between AN and hyperinsulinemia, and between subjects with AN and obesity. High insulin and cholesterol levels with obesity increase the risk for metabolic disease. Study limitations included the use of a convenience sample and the small sample size. The results of this study suggests that for this sample of children and adolescence who present both AN and obesity receiving early medical evaluation and treatment may be necessary. Further research should be geared towards replicating the study with a larger random sample and further identification of markers that place children at risk for obesity and insulin resistance.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:59:58Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:59:58Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.