Needed on the Border An Increased Awareness about Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149317
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Needed on the Border An Increased Awareness about Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome
Abstract:
Needed on the Border An Increased Awareness about Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Hernandez, Terry
P.I. Institution Name:Sierra Medical Center Hospital
Hantavirus poses an environmental hazard at the state, national and international levels. Because the reported average mortality rate is 50-60%, the Centers for Disease Control designated this virus as a mandatory notifiable disease at the national level in 1997. The initial outbreak came within the Four Corners Area of the Southwest that encompassed New Mexico, Arizona, Utah and Colorado, specifically within the Navajo Indian Reservation. The El Paso/Juarez metroplex is an especially high-risk area for Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome, necessitating public service campaigns and education that will result in decreased morbidity and mortality within this borderland region, secondary to an increased awareness. This poster presentation will present an overview of the Hantavirus infection process, which will include incidence and prevalence, theories of causation, pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, diagnostic criteria, and treatment strategies. Because the Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome is a serious infectious virus with no known cure or precise treatment, the strategic control and prevention through educational programs for consumers have been the key to awareness of this disease, thus an effort to control the disease, as well as, minimize outbreaks of the contamination. Healthcare professionals also need better strategies for making a differential diagnosis in order to quickly identify this syndrome specifically since the prodromal symptoms are of a flu-like presentation with rapid progressive pulmonary compromise towards eventual adult respiratory distress syndrome encompassing the progressive state of respiratory failure with death inevitable. To imagine that an enjoyable old fashion weekend camping with ground tent sleeping, hiking through the dirt pathways of the Franklin Mountains or sweeping out that long overdue closed up shed or garage could realistically become an outing of contamination risk of the hantavirus organism that may be dormant within that campsite ground, hiking pathway, or among the rodent droppings noticed while sweeping the shed. Why is this relevant? The causative agent, the Deer Mouse has become the hantavirus-carrying rodent, with an increase of population growth reflective from the 1997 El Nino environmental changes that resulted in an unusual wet environmental period that increased the quantities of food for these hantavirus-carrying rodents, thus increasing the population growth throughout the national and international boundaries. The virus may remain dormant as it thrives within the rodent’s urine, feces and saliva. Through environmental disturbance of a potential rodent infested area, the virus becomes airborne and through the aerosol effect of this environmental contaminant becomes inhaled, unknowingly contaminating the pulmonary organ system from 2 weeks to 24 hours. Hantavirus is considered a mystery because the virus may live dormant for years before the environmental area of its existence is disturbed, thus causing a contamination risk. Considering the increased rural population growth, the increased access of outdoor activities and the environmental changes occurring internationally and nationally, an increased awareness is needed not only along the international border but nationally as well. When will proactive preventive measures become a priority? Isn’t a mortality rate of 50-60% enough?
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNeeded on the Border An Increased Awareness about Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndromeen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149317-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Needed on the Border An Increased Awareness about Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hernandez, Terry</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Sierra Medical Center Hospital</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">terryh@utep.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Hantavirus poses an environmental hazard at the state, national and international levels. Because the reported average mortality rate is 50-60%, the Centers for Disease Control designated this virus as a mandatory notifiable disease at the national level in 1997. The initial outbreak came within the Four Corners Area of the Southwest that encompassed New Mexico, Arizona, Utah and Colorado, specifically within the Navajo Indian Reservation. The El Paso/Juarez metroplex is an especially high-risk area for Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome, necessitating public service campaigns and education that will result in decreased morbidity and mortality within this borderland region, secondary to an increased awareness. This poster presentation will present an overview of the Hantavirus infection process, which will include incidence and prevalence, theories of causation, pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, diagnostic criteria, and treatment strategies. Because the Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome is a serious infectious virus with no known cure or precise treatment, the strategic control and prevention through educational programs for consumers have been the key to awareness of this disease, thus an effort to control the disease, as well as, minimize outbreaks of the contamination. Healthcare professionals also need better strategies for making a differential diagnosis in order to quickly identify this syndrome specifically since the prodromal symptoms are of a flu-like presentation with rapid progressive pulmonary compromise towards eventual adult respiratory distress syndrome encompassing the progressive state of respiratory failure with death inevitable. To imagine that an enjoyable old fashion weekend camping with ground tent sleeping, hiking through the dirt pathways of the Franklin Mountains or sweeping out that long overdue closed up shed or garage could realistically become an outing of contamination risk of the hantavirus organism that may be dormant within that campsite ground, hiking pathway, or among the rodent droppings noticed while sweeping the shed. Why is this relevant? The causative agent, the Deer Mouse has become the hantavirus-carrying rodent, with an increase of population growth reflective from the 1997 El Nino environmental changes that resulted in an unusual wet environmental period that increased the quantities of food for these hantavirus-carrying rodents, thus increasing the population growth throughout the national and international boundaries. The virus may remain dormant as it thrives within the rodent&rsquo;s urine, feces and saliva. Through environmental disturbance of a potential rodent infested area, the virus becomes airborne and through the aerosol effect of this environmental contaminant becomes inhaled, unknowingly contaminating the pulmonary organ system from 2 weeks to 24 hours. Hantavirus is considered a mystery because the virus may live dormant for years before the environmental area of its existence is disturbed, thus causing a contamination risk. Considering the increased rural population growth, the increased access of outdoor activities and the environmental changes occurring internationally and nationally, an increased awareness is needed not only along the international border but nationally as well. When will proactive preventive measures become a priority? Isn&rsquo;t a mortality rate of 50-60% enough?</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:00:03Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:00:03Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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