2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149333
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Healing Art of Quilting
Abstract:
The Healing Art of Quilting
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Gueldner, Sarah, DNS/DNSc/DSN
P.I. Institution Name:Pennsylvania State University
Title:Associate Professor
Over the centuries women have made quilts to keep their families warm as they slept at night, to place lightly over their children during their naps, and over their sick or injured as they recovered. Women often come together in small groups as they quilt, and they take pride in their tiny stitches that will make the quilts last for a long, long time. Modern-day substitutes are often called “comforters”, hinting of the soothing feeling we find in “being covered”. Even as adults, we can still call up the image of our mothers, grandmothers, and aunts pulling the covers up around our shoulders as they lovingly tucked us into bed as children. Clearly, covers do more than keep you warm. Especially quilts. Somehow, as women sit together around the quilting frame, day after day, sometimes for months, they put their spirits into the quilts as well. And maybe even some of their virtue...patience, perseverance, gentleness, goodwill. But for certain they insert nurturance and comfort with every stitch. And quilts make people feel better, long after the women who made them are gone. This display honors quilting as a healing art, both in the making of quilts and in their use. Included are two short stories that tell of times when a quilt made a therapeutic difference in the lives of those it touched. The first story is about a tattered quilt that needed mending. It was a family quilt, passed down to one of the few members of the family who was still living. The story tells of how the challenge of mending the quilt gave a sense of purpose to our 80-year-old mother and helped her recover from a stroke. The second story tells how our mother was almost magically drawn to a homemade quilt at her church’s bazaar, just weeks after her husband of 59 years had died. She left the bazaar without buying the quilt, but she continued to think about it even after she had returned home. In fact, she “wished she just would have bought it”. Her daughter took her back to the church and, with the help of the church women, she bought the quilt and brought it home. As it turned out, she only lived for two more months, but she slept under that quilt every night and during her afternoon naps for the rest of her life...and we believe it brought her peace. We draped the quilt across the casket at her funeral so the church women who had made it and sold it to her could smile and find peace, too. The display will feature a large photograph of our mother as she worked to mend the badly worn quilt. There will also be a few quilt pieces that were “put together” by our grandmother and her friends almost a hundred years ago—providing an authentic sample of the tiny stitches as well as the art form.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Healing Art of Quiltingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149333-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Healing Art of Quilting</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Gueldner, Sarah, DNS/DNSc/DSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Pennsylvania State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">shg9@pau.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Over the centuries women have made quilts to keep their families warm as they slept at night, to place lightly over their children during their naps, and over their sick or injured as they recovered. Women often come together in small groups as they quilt, and they take pride in their tiny stitches that will make the quilts last for a long, long time. Modern-day substitutes are often called &ldquo;comforters&rdquo;, hinting of the soothing feeling we find in &ldquo;being covered&rdquo;. Even as adults, we can still call up the image of our mothers, grandmothers, and aunts pulling the covers up around our shoulders as they lovingly tucked us into bed as children. Clearly, covers do more than keep you warm. Especially quilts. Somehow, as women sit together around the quilting frame, day after day, sometimes for months, they put their spirits into the quilts as well. And maybe even some of their virtue...patience, perseverance, gentleness, goodwill. But for certain they insert nurturance and comfort with every stitch. And quilts make people feel better, long after the women who made them are gone. This display honors quilting as a healing art, both in the making of quilts and in their use. Included are two short stories that tell of times when a quilt made a therapeutic difference in the lives of those it touched. The first story is about a tattered quilt that needed mending. It was a family quilt, passed down to one of the few members of the family who was still living. The story tells of how the challenge of mending the quilt gave a sense of purpose to our 80-year-old mother and helped her recover from a stroke. The second story tells how our mother was almost magically drawn to a homemade quilt at her church&rsquo;s bazaar, just weeks after her husband of 59 years had died. She left the bazaar without buying the quilt, but she continued to think about it even after she had returned home. In fact, she &ldquo;wished she just would have bought it&rdquo;. Her daughter took her back to the church and, with the help of the church women, she bought the quilt and brought it home. As it turned out, she only lived for two more months, but she slept under that quilt every night and during her afternoon naps for the rest of her life...and we believe it brought her peace. We draped the quilt across the casket at her funeral so the church women who had made it and sold it to her could smile and find peace, too. The display will feature a large photograph of our mother as she worked to mend the badly worn quilt. There will also be a few quilt pieces that were &ldquo;put together&rdquo; by our grandmother and her friends almost a hundred years ago&mdash;providing an authentic sample of the tiny stitches as well as the art form.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:00:21Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:00:21Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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