2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149337
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Longitudinal Quality of Life in Liver Transplant Recipients
Abstract:
Longitudinal Quality of Life in Liver Transplant Recipients
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Schweitzer, Roberta
P.I. Institution Name:Indiana University-Kokomo
Title:Assistant Professor
On-going improvements in surgical interventions and medical treatments for people with chronic diseases have had years added to their lives. However, these medical technologies can also cause side effects that frequently result in persistent suffering and pain. This is the case for liver organ recipients who not only suffer the debilitating physical effects of the disease, but of its medical and surgical treatment as well. As a consequence, the health-related quality of life of these recipients has become increasingly important. Objective The purpose of this project was to explore the lived experience of liver transplant recipients during the first year of their post-transplant recovery process, with a specific focus on the health-related quality of life issues the recipients experienced. Design Data for this paper were collected from a qualitative longitudinal study utilizing a grounded theory methodology. Data were collected in 3 semi-structured interviews at 6-weeks, 6-months, and 12-months post-transplant. Interviews explored recipients' pre- and post-transplant experiences. Descriptive, phenomenological methods were used for data generation and the initial data analysis. The original data analysis identified five recovery themes related to the liver recipients' recovery process, one of which was "Quality of Life in Recovery". A secondary qualitative descriptive analysis was then undertaken using a health-related quality of life model as the underlying framework to further explore these health-related quality of life issues in greater depth. Sample The sample for the study included 20 liver transplant recipients who had recently undergone transplant surgery in a hospital-based organ transplant center. Setting The series of interviews was conducted in the hospital or at home for clients' convenience. Concept This secondary analysis was guided by a health-related quality of life (HRQL) framework composed of five HRQL domains including the 1) Physical, 2) Psychological, 3) Social, 4) Economic, and 5) Spiritual/Religious (Spilker, 1996). Findings 1) Will I survive? Will I ever enjoy good health again?: a) Health Status; b) Level of Functioning; 3) Changes in Physical Appearance; 2) Will I Ever Feel Myself again?: a) Health Status ; b) Sense of Self; 3) Will I be socially isolated? Can I still be a productive member of the community? a) Family and Friends; b) Work and Community; 4) Am I going to survive economically? a) Employment Issues; b) Healthcare Costs; 5) Will my life continue to have meaning? What will help sustain me in uncertainty that lies ahead? a) A Miracle; b) Reassessment of Priorities and Perspectives; b) Reaffirmation of Faith. Conclusions This study has been useful in illuminating facets of health-related quality of life in liver recipients that may not otherwise be appreciated by nurses and other health care professional. There are many life-changing concerns beyond the immediate physical concern of liver rejection, some of which are not obvious until after the recipients have gone home for the recovery period. This is especially true in the economic, social, and spiritual domains of quality of life. Implications Results of this study can assist in improving the healthcare experiences and outcomes in this population. Specifically, this knowledge should aid nurses in their holistic assessment and intervention development to address the ongoing complexities of the liver transplant recovery process.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleLongitudinal Quality of Life in Liver Transplant Recipientsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149337-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Longitudinal Quality of Life in Liver Transplant Recipients</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Schweitzer, Roberta</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Indiana University-Kokomo</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">roschwei@iuk.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">On-going improvements in surgical interventions and medical treatments for people with chronic diseases have had years added to their lives. However, these medical technologies can also cause side effects that frequently result in persistent suffering and pain. This is the case for liver organ recipients who not only suffer the debilitating physical effects of the disease, but of its medical and surgical treatment as well. As a consequence, the health-related quality of life of these recipients has become increasingly important. Objective The purpose of this project was to explore the lived experience of liver transplant recipients during the first year of their post-transplant recovery process, with a specific focus on the health-related quality of life issues the recipients experienced. Design Data for this paper were collected from a qualitative longitudinal study utilizing a grounded theory methodology. Data were collected in 3 semi-structured interviews at 6-weeks, 6-months, and 12-months post-transplant. Interviews explored recipients' pre- and post-transplant experiences. Descriptive, phenomenological methods were used for data generation and the initial data analysis. The original data analysis identified five recovery themes related to the liver recipients' recovery process, one of which was &quot;Quality of Life in Recovery&quot;. A secondary qualitative descriptive analysis was then undertaken using a health-related quality of life model as the underlying framework to further explore these health-related quality of life issues in greater depth. Sample The sample for the study included 20 liver transplant recipients who had recently undergone transplant surgery in a hospital-based organ transplant center. Setting The series of interviews was conducted in the hospital or at home for clients' convenience. Concept This secondary analysis was guided by a health-related quality of life (HRQL) framework composed of five HRQL domains including the 1) Physical, 2) Psychological, 3) Social, 4) Economic, and 5) Spiritual/Religious (Spilker, 1996). Findings 1) Will I survive? Will I ever enjoy good health again?: a) Health Status; b) Level of Functioning; 3) Changes in Physical Appearance; 2) Will I Ever Feel Myself again?: a) Health Status ; b) Sense of Self; 3) Will I be socially isolated? Can I still be a productive member of the community? a) Family and Friends; b) Work and Community; 4) Am I going to survive economically? a) Employment Issues; b) Healthcare Costs; 5) Will my life continue to have meaning? What will help sustain me in uncertainty that lies ahead? a) A Miracle; b) Reassessment of Priorities and Perspectives; b) Reaffirmation of Faith. Conclusions This study has been useful in illuminating facets of health-related quality of life in liver recipients that may not otherwise be appreciated by nurses and other health care professional. There are many life-changing concerns beyond the immediate physical concern of liver rejection, some of which are not obvious until after the recipients have gone home for the recovery period. This is especially true in the economic, social, and spiritual domains of quality of life. Implications Results of this study can assist in improving the healthcare experiences and outcomes in this population. Specifically, this knowledge should aid nurses in their holistic assessment and intervention development to address the ongoing complexities of the liver transplant recovery process.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:00:25Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:00:25Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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