Think First for Kids!! Testing a school based injury prevention program

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149339
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Think First for Kids!! Testing a school based injury prevention program
Abstract:
Think First for Kids!! Testing a school based injury prevention program
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Lobo, Marie, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Medical University of South Carolina
Title:Assistant Professor
Objective: The purpose of this paper is to describe the change in knowledge in school aged children receiving a school based head and spinal cord injury prevention program. Think First for Kids!, a program designed by the Think First Foundation and tested with school children in the Southeastern United States. The curriculum is designed to decrease head and spinal cord injuries in children from bicycle, traffic, water, firearm and gun, and playground related events. Design: This is a prospective study using a pre and post intervention test design. Sample: The sample includes 874 normal, healthy, school aged children (kindergarten through 3rd grade) with matched pre and post intervention data and attending public school in the Southeastern United States. The sample included 93 kindergarten children, 367 first graders, 166 second graders and 248 third graders. Setting: All data were collected at the schools of the participants. Concepts: Knowledge about bicycle, traffic, water, fire arm and gun, and playground injury prevention. Measures: Age specific tests of information contained in the curriculum were developed, reviewed for content validity and age appropriateness before being used with the students. Children in kindergarten and first grade received pictures to match. The tests became more difficult as they progressed from first through third grade. Care was taken to use testing styles similar to those in classroom work. The pretest was given to the students prior to implementation of the first class. Within two weeks of completion of the program a post test was given, covering similar material to the pretest. Findings: There were significant differences in knowledge pre and post intervention. Using paired t-tests on all 874 students t = 8.053, p = .000; kindergarten (n = 93) t=3.466, p = .001; first grade (n = 367), t = 3.247, p = .001; second grade (n = 166) t = 5.897, p = .000; third grade (n = 248), t = 4.667, p = .000. Implications: A school based intervention program can increase student knowledge about injury prevention. The reading level of students varied by schools, with children attending schools where more children were known to enter school unprepared having more difficulty with the tests. Additional study is needed in several areas including: changes in injury risk behaviors and how to communicate the information to parents to increase the likelihood they will require the student to take injury prevention measures.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThink First for Kids!! Testing a school based injury prevention programen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149339-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Think First for Kids!! Testing a school based injury prevention program</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lobo, Marie, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Medical University of South Carolina</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lobom1@musc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: The purpose of this paper is to describe the change in knowledge in school aged children receiving a school based head and spinal cord injury prevention program. Think First for Kids!, a program designed by the Think First Foundation and tested with school children in the Southeastern United States. The curriculum is designed to decrease head and spinal cord injuries in children from bicycle, traffic, water, firearm and gun, and playground related events. Design: This is a prospective study using a pre and post intervention test design. Sample: The sample includes 874 normal, healthy, school aged children (kindergarten through 3rd grade) with matched pre and post intervention data and attending public school in the Southeastern United States. The sample included 93 kindergarten children, 367 first graders, 166 second graders and 248 third graders. Setting: All data were collected at the schools of the participants. Concepts: Knowledge about bicycle, traffic, water, fire arm and gun, and playground injury prevention. Measures: Age specific tests of information contained in the curriculum were developed, reviewed for content validity and age appropriateness before being used with the students. Children in kindergarten and first grade received pictures to match. The tests became more difficult as they progressed from first through third grade. Care was taken to use testing styles similar to those in classroom work. The pretest was given to the students prior to implementation of the first class. Within two weeks of completion of the program a post test was given, covering similar material to the pretest. Findings: There were significant differences in knowledge pre and post intervention. Using paired t-tests on all 874 students t = 8.053, p = .000; kindergarten (n = 93) t=3.466, p = .001; first grade (n = 367), t = 3.247, p = .001; second grade (n = 166) t = 5.897, p = .000; third grade (n = 248), t = 4.667, p = .000. Implications: A school based intervention program can increase student knowledge about injury prevention. The reading level of students varied by schools, with children attending schools where more children were known to enter school unprepared having more difficulty with the tests. Additional study is needed in several areas including: changes in injury risk behaviors and how to communicate the information to parents to increase the likelihood they will require the student to take injury prevention measures.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:00:27Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:00:27Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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