Tellington Touch before Venipuncture: An Exploratory Descriptive Study

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149342
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Tellington Touch before Venipuncture: An Exploratory Descriptive Study
Abstract:
Tellington Touch before Venipuncture: An Exploratory Descriptive Study
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Wendler, M.
P.I. Institution Name:University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire
Human to human touch is an integral part of nursing practice, communicating caring in the human health experience. Touch is deeply embedded within the contextual situation of nursing care flow and much of nurses’ access to information about patients and their environments unfold through processes involving touch. An emerging intervention, Tellington touch (t-touch), is a simple-to-learn, easy-to-implement natural healing modality. By combining simultaneous processes of mindful, gentle physical touch, breath control and awareness and specific touch activities, t-touch is a method of communicating caring and connection. Despite 15 years’ of evidence outlining reported benefits anecdotally, no investigation of t-touch has yet been reported. The purpose of this qualitative descriptive research was to explore, describe and discover the experiences of study participants receiving (n=47) and practitioner (n=1) administering t-touch to healthy persons awaiting venipuncture. Implications for nursing practice and future research are offered within a framework of caring communication.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTellington Touch before Venipuncture: An Exploratory Descriptive Studyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149342-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Tellington Touch before Venipuncture: An Exploratory Descriptive Study</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Wendler, M.</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">wendlem@uwec.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Human to human touch is an integral part of nursing practice, communicating caring in the human health experience. Touch is deeply embedded within the contextual situation of nursing care flow and much of nurses&rsquo; access to information about patients and their environments unfold through processes involving touch. An emerging intervention, Tellington touch (t-touch), is a simple-to-learn, easy-to-implement natural healing modality. By combining simultaneous processes of mindful, gentle physical touch, breath control and awareness and specific touch activities, t-touch is a method of communicating caring and connection. Despite 15 years&rsquo; of evidence outlining reported benefits anecdotally, no investigation of t-touch has yet been reported. The purpose of this qualitative descriptive research was to explore, describe and discover the experiences of study participants receiving (n=47) and practitioner (n=1) administering t-touch to healthy persons awaiting venipuncture. Implications for nursing practice and future research are offered within a framework of caring communication.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:00:31Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:00:31Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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