Prediction of Pregnancy Outcomes from Measures of Adaptation to Pregnancy and Family Functioning

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149344
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Prediction of Pregnancy Outcomes from Measures of Adaptation to Pregnancy and Family Functioning
Abstract:
Prediction of Pregnancy Outcomes from Measures of Adaptation to Pregnancy and Family Functioning
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Lederman, Regina, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Texas at Galveston
Title:Professor
Objective: To evaluate the usefulness of a set of biographic variables, and a set of psychosocial scales, in explaining variation in several pregnancy outcome variables: Newborn Weight, Length of Gestation, Gestational Age at First Prenatal Visit, Apgar 1- and 5-minute Scores, and Complications in Pregnancy, Labor, and Delivery. Design: Questionnaire assessments of adaptation to pregnancy and family functioning were made of pregnant women in the latter half of pregnancy. Sample: Pregnant women: 27 African-American, 47 Latin American, and 33 Anglo-American. Most subjects were 18-36 years, had 12 years or less education, were low-income, had no health insurance, and had a parity of 0 or 1. Setting: Data were collected in two University Hospital Obstetric Clinics. Instruments/Concept Variables: I. Independent Predictor Variables: 1. Demographic variables. 2. The Prenatal Self-Evaluation Questionnaire scales (PSEQ) and their Cronbach alpha reliability coefficients are: Acceptance of Pregnancy (a = .86), Identification of a Motherhood Role (a = .73), Relationship with Mother (a = .92), Relationship with Husband or Partner (a = 79.), Preparation for Labor (a = .76), Concern about Well-Being of Self and Infant in Labor (a = .75), Fear of Pain, Helplessness, and Loss of Control in Labor (a = .67). 3. The Family Adaptability (AD) and Cohesion (CO) Evaluation Scales II (FACES). Cronbach’s alpha for the two FACES scales on AD and CO were a = .59 and .57, respectively. II. Dependent Outcome Variables: Newborn Weight, Length of Gestation, Gestational Age at First Prenatal Visit, Apgar 1 and 5-minute Scores, and Complications in Pregnancy, Labor, and Delivery. In the multiple regression analyses, Antepartum Complications were analyzed both as dependent and independent variables. Findings: Data were analyzed using ordinary least squares regression. The regression results indicate that some of the biographic variables and several of the prenatal psychosocial questionnaire scales related to pregnancy outcomes. The prenatal scale on maternal Preparation for Labor (PREPL) significantly predicted Newborn Weight (R2 = .04, F = 4.48, p = .04). For Gestational Age at First Prenatal Visit (R2 = .06, F = 2.28, p = .05); important predictors included Parity--primipara or multipara, and Identification of a Motherhood Role. Only Antepartum Complications and Smoking during Pregnancy predicted Apgar 1- and 5-minute scores (R2 = .11, F = 3.12, p = .01; and R2 = .12, F = 4.94, p = .003, respectively). Identification of a Motherhood Role predicted Antepartal Complications (R2 = .04, F = 4.58, p = .04). Lastly, for Intrapartal Complications (R2 = .15, F = 5.23, p = .001), significant predictor variables included Antepartal Complications, Smoking during Pregnancy, Family Cohesion, and Family Adaptability. Lower reliability coefficients for some scales (Family Cohesion and Adaptation) likely reduced the effect sizes of the regressions. Because of the relatively small sample size in this exploratory study, the presentation will focus on interpreting effect sizes (squared semipartial correlations). Conclusions/Implications: The results indicate that psychosocial dimensions pertaining to developmental and adaptive responses to pregnancy, family functioning, and marital and smoking status are significant predictors of pregnancy complications and pregnancy outcomes, even in the presence of antepartal complications, and warrant inclusion in prenatal assessment and health care intervention.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePrediction of Pregnancy Outcomes from Measures of Adaptation to Pregnancy and Family Functioningen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149344-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Prediction of Pregnancy Outcomes from Measures of Adaptation to Pregnancy and Family Functioning</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lederman, Regina, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Texas at Galveston</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">rlederma@utmb.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: To evaluate the usefulness of a set of biographic variables, and a set of psychosocial scales, in explaining variation in several pregnancy outcome variables: Newborn Weight, Length of Gestation, Gestational Age at First Prenatal Visit, Apgar 1- and 5-minute Scores, and Complications in Pregnancy, Labor, and Delivery. Design: Questionnaire assessments of adaptation to pregnancy and family functioning were made of pregnant women in the latter half of pregnancy. Sample: Pregnant women: 27 African-American, 47 Latin American, and 33 Anglo-American. Most subjects were 18-36 years, had 12 years or less education, were low-income, had no health insurance, and had a parity of 0 or 1. Setting: Data were collected in two University Hospital Obstetric Clinics. Instruments/Concept Variables: I. Independent Predictor Variables: 1. Demographic variables. 2. The Prenatal Self-Evaluation Questionnaire scales (PSEQ) and their Cronbach alpha reliability coefficients are: Acceptance of Pregnancy (a = .86), Identification of a Motherhood Role (a = .73), Relationship with Mother (a = .92), Relationship with Husband or Partner (a = 79.), Preparation for Labor (a = .76), Concern about Well-Being of Self and Infant in Labor (a = .75), Fear of Pain, Helplessness, and Loss of Control in Labor (a = .67). 3. The Family Adaptability (AD) and Cohesion (CO) Evaluation Scales II (FACES). Cronbach&rsquo;s alpha for the two FACES scales on AD and CO were a = .59 and .57, respectively. II. Dependent Outcome Variables: Newborn Weight, Length of Gestation, Gestational Age at First Prenatal Visit, Apgar 1 and 5-minute Scores, and Complications in Pregnancy, Labor, and Delivery. In the multiple regression analyses, Antepartum Complications were analyzed both as dependent and independent variables. Findings: Data were analyzed using ordinary least squares regression. The regression results indicate that some of the biographic variables and several of the prenatal psychosocial questionnaire scales related to pregnancy outcomes. The prenatal scale on maternal Preparation for Labor (PREPL) significantly predicted Newborn Weight (R2 = .04, F = 4.48, p = .04). For Gestational Age at First Prenatal Visit (R2 = .06, F = 2.28, p = .05); important predictors included Parity--primipara or multipara, and Identification of a Motherhood Role. Only Antepartum Complications and Smoking during Pregnancy predicted Apgar 1- and 5-minute scores (R2 = .11, F = 3.12, p = .01; and R2 = .12, F = 4.94, p = .003, respectively). Identification of a Motherhood Role predicted Antepartal Complications (R2 = .04, F = 4.58, p = .04). Lastly, for Intrapartal Complications (R2 = .15, F = 5.23, p = .001), significant predictor variables included Antepartal Complications, Smoking during Pregnancy, Family Cohesion, and Family Adaptability. Lower reliability coefficients for some scales (Family Cohesion and Adaptation) likely reduced the effect sizes of the regressions. Because of the relatively small sample size in this exploratory study, the presentation will focus on interpreting effect sizes (squared semipartial correlations). Conclusions/Implications: The results indicate that psychosocial dimensions pertaining to developmental and adaptive responses to pregnancy, family functioning, and marital and smoking status are significant predictors of pregnancy complications and pregnancy outcomes, even in the presence of antepartal complications, and warrant inclusion in prenatal assessment and health care intervention.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:00:33Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:00:33Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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