The Experience of Multiracial Adult Family Caregivers in the Rural Southeastern United States

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149345
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Experience of Multiracial Adult Family Caregivers in the Rural Southeastern United States
Abstract:
The Experience of Multiracial Adult Family Caregivers in the Rural Southeastern United States
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Riffle, Kathryn
P.I. Institution Name:Delta State University
Design: Two interviewers conducted the interviews, which were transcribed and subsequently coded by the three-member research team using the method of constant comparisons. Sample: The purposive sample consisted of 15 black, 10 white, and one Asian subjects. Setting: The study was conducted in two rural communities in the southeastern United States, one in Mississippi and one in Arkansas. Measures/Instruments: The concept of family caregiving was defined as having major responsibility for the care of an elderly family member on an ongoing basis. The open-ended interview was the method used to collect data. A demographic form was used to elicit background information on the family caregivers. Findings: Analysis revealed that the caregivers coped with the declining ability of the aging relative to care for him or herself by making the decision to care for the older person. The basic social process (BSP) identified was: “coping with the event of the declining ability of the aging relative to care for self.” Subsidiary concepts included: (1) facing the crisis, (2) taking action, and (3) lessons from the experience. A life event for the older person which resulted in a family crisis included: “he had a stroke and then I believe he had another stroke” and “mother broke her hip and she ended up having three hip surgeries.” Taking action pertained to the decision to assume the caregiving role: “there was no other choice, I’m the only one.” Lessons from the experience included knowing that the elderly person had the “right kind of care.” All caregivers reported that family conflicts affected the caregiver’s lifestyle. More white caregivers revealed that respite was a problem, receiving less help from other family members. Both black and white caregivers mentioned using nursing homes as a last resort. The Asian respondent preferred the option of hiring additional help rather than using a nursing home. Conclusions: All families reported family values as influencing the decision to care for an older family member, with black respondents more often reporting religious values as an additional influence. Family caregivers of all backgrounds reported feeling rewarded for being able to pay back the older family member for the care they received as children. Implications: With the increasing numbers of older persons in our society, family members often assume ongoing caregiving responsibilities. Caregiving can be stressful because of lack of respite and family conflicts. Nurses can facilitate family caregivers by working with the primary caregiver and other family members to strengthen support networks and promoting self care fore the caregiver.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Experience of Multiracial Adult Family Caregivers in the Rural Southeastern United Statesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149345-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Experience of Multiracial Adult Family Caregivers in the Rural Southeastern United States</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Riffle, Kathryn</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Delta State University</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kriffle@deltast.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Design: Two interviewers conducted the interviews, which were transcribed and subsequently coded by the three-member research team using the method of constant comparisons. Sample: The purposive sample consisted of 15 black, 10 white, and one Asian subjects. Setting: The study was conducted in two rural communities in the southeastern United States, one in Mississippi and one in Arkansas. Measures/Instruments: The concept of family caregiving was defined as having major responsibility for the care of an elderly family member on an ongoing basis. The open-ended interview was the method used to collect data. A demographic form was used to elicit background information on the family caregivers. Findings: Analysis revealed that the caregivers coped with the declining ability of the aging relative to care for him or herself by making the decision to care for the older person. The basic social process (BSP) identified was: &ldquo;coping with the event of the declining ability of the aging relative to care for self.&rdquo; Subsidiary concepts included: (1) facing the crisis, (2) taking action, and (3) lessons from the experience. A life event for the older person which resulted in a family crisis included: &ldquo;he had a stroke and then I believe he had another stroke&rdquo; and &ldquo;mother broke her hip and she ended up having three hip surgeries.&rdquo; Taking action pertained to the decision to assume the caregiving role: &ldquo;there was no other choice, I&rsquo;m the only one.&rdquo; Lessons from the experience included knowing that the elderly person had the &ldquo;right kind of care.&rdquo; All caregivers reported that family conflicts affected the caregiver&rsquo;s lifestyle. More white caregivers revealed that respite was a problem, receiving less help from other family members. Both black and white caregivers mentioned using nursing homes as a last resort. The Asian respondent preferred the option of hiring additional help rather than using a nursing home. Conclusions: All families reported family values as influencing the decision to care for an older family member, with black respondents more often reporting religious values as an additional influence. Family caregivers of all backgrounds reported feeling rewarded for being able to pay back the older family member for the care they received as children. Implications: With the increasing numbers of older persons in our society, family members often assume ongoing caregiving responsibilities. Caregiving can be stressful because of lack of respite and family conflicts. Nurses can facilitate family caregivers by working with the primary caregiver and other family members to strengthen support networks and promoting self care fore the caregiver.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:00:34Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:00:34Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.