The experience of electronic social support in an online heart disease discussion group

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149348
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The experience of electronic social support in an online heart disease discussion group
Abstract:
The experience of electronic social support in an online heart disease discussion group
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:LaCoursiere, Sheryl
P.I. Institution Name:University of Connecticut
OBJECTIVE: To understand the experience of social support in persons who participate in online discussion groups for heart disease. DESIGN: Phenomenological qualitative pilot study using Colaizzi's (1978) method. Question: What is the experience of social support in persons who participate in online discussion groups for heart disease? SAMPLE: The purposive sample consisted of three women ranging in age from 51 to 65 from Oklahoma and California who had heart disease, and participated in an online heart disease discussion group. All had had coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery. Two of the participants experienced recurrent angina, two were diabetic, and one had congestive heart failure. SETTING: The study was conducted electronically. Participants were recruited from an online heart disease electronic support group. NAMES OF VARIABLES OR CONCEPT: Online social support. MEASURES/INSTRUMENTS: None- phenomenological. FINDINGS: Electronic interviews were conducted over the course of several weeks, with a range of 5 to 18 days. Eight themes related to the experience of social support in an online heart disease discussion group emerged. The themes were: (1) The support elsewhere was not adequate, and there was nowhere else to turn; (2) The group offers a place to exchange information and honest advice; (3) The group offers interpersonal and moral support while the women gather the courage to cope; (4) The sophisticated humor of the list offers a respite from everyday problems; (5) The women have developed meaningful public and private friendships in the group; (6) The group provides understanding and commonality in a way that no one else can; (7) The women feel a wide range of profound emotions as a result of their participation in the group, and (8) The women feel empowered as a result of their participation in the group. Findings were very consistent with previous literature related to the experience of heart disease in non-Internet users, as well as Internet users with automatic implantable cardioverter defibrillators (AICDs) and other chronic illnesses such as diabetes and multiple sclerosis. CONCLUSIONS: The theme clusters generated from this study were very consistent with those of previous studies. In the two studies that were most closely allied with the current study, distinct parallels emerged. The constitutive pattern of "therapeutic connection" by Dickerson et al. (2000) in an online implantable cardioverter defibrillator group, as well as the four themes of seeking and giving meaningful information, sharing personal perspectives, storytelling as common grounding and supportive interacting were closely allied with the themes of information exchange, interpersonal and moral support, meaningful public and private friendships, and commonality found in this study. The results were also consistent with the themes of lessened anxiety and enlarged social support systems found by Scherrer-Bannerman et al. (2000) in web-based preoperative CABG support patients, and are comparable to the themes of interpersonal and moral support, and a range of emotions found in this study. IMPLICATIONS: This study is very relevant to nursing. Of all the health professions, nursing is frequently in a position most accessible to the patient, and most trusted. As was seen in this study, the words and actions of a nurse are memorable, and are long remembered by a patient. In addition, the study findings reveal that nurses are welcomed as participants in online support groups, both as providers of information, and as learners of the patients' experiences. This has great implications for the planning of future nursing interventions, particularly as use of the Internet grows. By determining interventions that would be most effective in the care of, and accepted by patients, there would be a great potential for not only satisfaction, but the generation of beneficial outcomes in those with heart disease. By understanding the experience of online support in heart disease, nurses can plan for the impact of planned procedures and surgeries, and dealing with the sequelae of cardiac illness from a patient-centered perspective.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe experience of electronic social support in an online heart disease discussion groupen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149348-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The experience of electronic social support in an online heart disease discussion group</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">LaCoursiere, Sheryl</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Connecticut</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">sheryl.lacoursiere@uconn.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">OBJECTIVE: To understand the experience of social support in persons who participate in online discussion groups for heart disease. DESIGN: Phenomenological qualitative pilot study using Colaizzi's (1978) method. Question: What is the experience of social support in persons who participate in online discussion groups for heart disease? SAMPLE: The purposive sample consisted of three women ranging in age from 51 to 65 from Oklahoma and California who had heart disease, and participated in an online heart disease discussion group. All had had coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery. Two of the participants experienced recurrent angina, two were diabetic, and one had congestive heart failure. SETTING: The study was conducted electronically. Participants were recruited from an online heart disease electronic support group. NAMES OF VARIABLES OR CONCEPT: Online social support. MEASURES/INSTRUMENTS: None- phenomenological. FINDINGS: Electronic interviews were conducted over the course of several weeks, with a range of 5 to 18 days. Eight themes related to the experience of social support in an online heart disease discussion group emerged. The themes were: (1) The support elsewhere was not adequate, and there was nowhere else to turn; (2) The group offers a place to exchange information and honest advice; (3) The group offers interpersonal and moral support while the women gather the courage to cope; (4) The sophisticated humor of the list offers a respite from everyday problems; (5) The women have developed meaningful public and private friendships in the group; (6) The group provides understanding and commonality in a way that no one else can; (7) The women feel a wide range of profound emotions as a result of their participation in the group, and (8) The women feel empowered as a result of their participation in the group. Findings were very consistent with previous literature related to the experience of heart disease in non-Internet users, as well as Internet users with automatic implantable cardioverter defibrillators (AICDs) and other chronic illnesses such as diabetes and multiple sclerosis. CONCLUSIONS: The theme clusters generated from this study were very consistent with those of previous studies. In the two studies that were most closely allied with the current study, distinct parallels emerged. The constitutive pattern of &quot;therapeutic connection&quot; by Dickerson et al. (2000) in an online implantable cardioverter defibrillator group, as well as the four themes of seeking and giving meaningful information, sharing personal perspectives, storytelling as common grounding and supportive interacting were closely allied with the themes of information exchange, interpersonal and moral support, meaningful public and private friendships, and commonality found in this study. The results were also consistent with the themes of lessened anxiety and enlarged social support systems found by Scherrer-Bannerman et al. (2000) in web-based preoperative CABG support patients, and are comparable to the themes of interpersonal and moral support, and a range of emotions found in this study. IMPLICATIONS: This study is very relevant to nursing. Of all the health professions, nursing is frequently in a position most accessible to the patient, and most trusted. As was seen in this study, the words and actions of a nurse are memorable, and are long remembered by a patient. In addition, the study findings reveal that nurses are welcomed as participants in online support groups, both as providers of information, and as learners of the patients' experiences. This has great implications for the planning of future nursing interventions, particularly as use of the Internet grows. By determining interventions that would be most effective in the care of, and accepted by patients, there would be a great potential for not only satisfaction, but the generation of beneficial outcomes in those with heart disease. By understanding the experience of online support in heart disease, nurses can plan for the impact of planned procedures and surgeries, and dealing with the sequelae of cardiac illness from a patient-centered perspective.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:00:38Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:00:38Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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