A psychometric evaluation of selected pain intensity scales for use in cognitively intact and cognitively impaired minority elders

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149349
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A psychometric evaluation of selected pain intensity scales for use in cognitively intact and cognitively impaired minority elders
Abstract:
A psychometric evaluation of selected pain intensity scales for use in cognitively intact and cognitively impaired minority elders
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Taylor, Laurie
P.I. Institution Name:State University of West Georgia
Title:Professor
The elderly population is becoming more racially, ethnically, and culturally diverse. Accurate assessment of pain and adequate treatment across all ages and ethnic groups has been recommended by key policy, professional, and regulatory agencies including the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research (1992 & 1994), the American Geriatrics Society (1998), and the American Pain Society (1999). Additionally, assessment of pain in cognitively impaired elders can be a challenge for the health care practitioner in terms of finding a tool that is easy to administer, simple to understand, and one that provides useful information. Although psychometric evaluation of pain assessment tools for use with older adults is growing, data addressing appropriate tools and strategies for assessing pain in cognitively impaired ethnic minorities are still quite limited. The purpose of this study was to determine the reliability and validity of selected pain intensity measurements as methods of assessing pain in cognitively impaired minority elders. The specific objectives of this study were to determine: 1. if cognitively intact and cognitively impaired minority elders are able to use selected pain intensity measures to rate their pain, 2. the associations among the Faces Pain Scale (Bieri etal., 1990) the Verbal Descriptor Scale, the Numeric rating scale, and the Iowa Pain Thermometer (Herr, 2000) when used to rate current pain and a vividly remembered pain, 3. the reliability of responses of responses on all instruments when rating a vividly remembered pain, 4. tool preference among the elderly population, and 5. if tool preference is related to cognitive status, educational level, age, race, and/or gender. A descriptive correlational research design was used to guide this study in answering the research questions. A convenience sample of 57 volunteer subjects aged 58 and older residing in the South comprised the study. The sample consisted of 8 males and 49 females with a mean age of 76. Fifty-nine percent of the sample completed 11th grade or less, and 59% completed high school and/or college. The Mini Mental State Exam (Folstein, Folstein, & McHugh, 1975) was used to screen for cognitive impairment. Seventy-seven percent (n=44) of the sample scored 24 or less indicating some degree of cognitive impairment. The remaining 23% (n=13) were cognitively intact. Findings of the study revealed that all of the subjects were able to use the tools to rate their pain. Concurrent validity of the scales was supported with Spearman rank correlation coefficients ranging from .74 to .83 in the cognitively impaired group and .81 to .96 in the cognitively intact group. Test-retest reliability at a two-week interval was acceptable in the cognitively intact group (Spearman rank correlations ranged from .73 to .83) and to a lesser degree in the cognitively impaired group (correlations ranged from .52 to .79). When asked about tool preference, the cognitively impaired group indicated a preference for the Iowa Pain Thermometer, and the intact group indicated a preference for the Faces Pain Scale. In summary, findings of this study revealed that cognitive impairment does not inhibit the ability to use a variety of pain intensity scales. Additionally, options should be provided that address individual needs of minority elders such as cognitive status, education, and culture.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA psychometric evaluation of selected pain intensity scales for use in cognitively intact and cognitively impaired minority eldersen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149349-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A psychometric evaluation of selected pain intensity scales for use in cognitively intact and cognitively impaired minority elders</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Taylor, Laurie</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">State University of West Georgia</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ltaylor@westga.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The elderly population is becoming more racially, ethnically, and culturally diverse. Accurate assessment of pain and adequate treatment across all ages and ethnic groups has been recommended by key policy, professional, and regulatory agencies including the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research (1992 &amp; 1994), the American Geriatrics Society (1998), and the American Pain Society (1999). Additionally, assessment of pain in cognitively impaired elders can be a challenge for the health care practitioner in terms of finding a tool that is easy to administer, simple to understand, and one that provides useful information. Although psychometric evaluation of pain assessment tools for use with older adults is growing, data addressing appropriate tools and strategies for assessing pain in cognitively impaired ethnic minorities are still quite limited. The purpose of this study was to determine the reliability and validity of selected pain intensity measurements as methods of assessing pain in cognitively impaired minority elders. The specific objectives of this study were to determine: 1. if cognitively intact and cognitively impaired minority elders are able to use selected pain intensity measures to rate their pain, 2. the associations among the Faces Pain Scale (Bieri etal., 1990) the Verbal Descriptor Scale, the Numeric rating scale, and the Iowa Pain Thermometer (Herr, 2000) when used to rate current pain and a vividly remembered pain, 3. the reliability of responses of responses on all instruments when rating a vividly remembered pain, 4. tool preference among the elderly population, and 5. if tool preference is related to cognitive status, educational level, age, race, and/or gender. A descriptive correlational research design was used to guide this study in answering the research questions. A convenience sample of 57 volunteer subjects aged 58 and older residing in the South comprised the study. The sample consisted of 8 males and 49 females with a mean age of 76. Fifty-nine percent of the sample completed 11th grade or less, and 59% completed high school and/or college. The Mini Mental State Exam (Folstein, Folstein, &amp; McHugh, 1975) was used to screen for cognitive impairment. Seventy-seven percent (n=44) of the sample scored 24 or less indicating some degree of cognitive impairment. The remaining 23% (n=13) were cognitively intact. Findings of the study revealed that all of the subjects were able to use the tools to rate their pain. Concurrent validity of the scales was supported with Spearman rank correlation coefficients ranging from .74 to .83 in the cognitively impaired group and .81 to .96 in the cognitively intact group. Test-retest reliability at a two-week interval was acceptable in the cognitively intact group (Spearman rank correlations ranged from .73 to .83) and to a lesser degree in the cognitively impaired group (correlations ranged from .52 to .79). When asked about tool preference, the cognitively impaired group indicated a preference for the Iowa Pain Thermometer, and the intact group indicated a preference for the Faces Pain Scale. In summary, findings of this study revealed that cognitive impairment does not inhibit the ability to use a variety of pain intensity scales. Additionally, options should be provided that address individual needs of minority elders such as cognitive status, education, and culture.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:00:39Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:00:39Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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