An Evaluation of Factors Underlying Registered Nurse Turnover: A Qualitative Study

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149350
Type:
Presentation
Title:
An Evaluation of Factors Underlying Registered Nurse Turnover: A Qualitative Study
Abstract:
An Evaluation of Factors Underlying Registered Nurse Turnover: A Qualitative Study
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Moore, Jayne, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Nevada-Reno
Title:Graduate Program Coordinator
Objective: The purpose of this pilot study was to identify perceptions RNs have related to factors prompting them to leave employment in acute care settings and to identify any disparity between what the RNs were telling employers were the reasons for leaving employment and what they revealed to a third party. Design: Qualitative descriptive design using focus group methodology. Sample: A sample was drawn from RNs who resigned from 2 major employers between January 1999 and December 1999 and who were eligible for rehire. A sample of 7 RNs participated in focus groups (mean age 44 years). Procedure: 80 invitations to participate in the focus groups examining nurse turnover were mailed to nurses meeting the study criteria with a follow-up postcard mailed 3 weeks later. A phone call was made to nurses agreeing to participate, clarifying the purpose of the study and to give directions for the focus group. Focus groups were held on a University Campus with one facilitator asking 6 open-ended questions. Data was collected using 2 voice activated recorders, and then was transcribed verbatim. Researchers reviewed the transcriptions for themes, categories, and repeating patterns independently and then together. Results: Respondents reported that they left their positions due to ineffective management practices, support, and failure to listen to concerns, short staffing, and little or no effort at nurse retention by employers. They reported attempting to change the work environment prior to leaving and when that did not ”work” left the setting. The reasons they told their employers they were leaving were diverse. Conclusions: The reasons nurses leave employment is diverse, related to management practice, short staffing, and sense of lack of appreciation for doing important work. Implications: Retention efforts need to focus on issues important to the nurses. A new vision of teamwork for the nursing staff is necessary.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAn Evaluation of Factors Underlying Registered Nurse Turnover: A Qualitative Studyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149350-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">An Evaluation of Factors Underlying Registered Nurse Turnover: A Qualitative Study</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Moore, Jayne, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Nevada-Reno</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Graduate Program Coordinator</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jaynem@unr.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: The purpose of this pilot study was to identify perceptions RNs have related to factors prompting them to leave employment in acute care settings and to identify any disparity between what the RNs were telling employers were the reasons for leaving employment and what they revealed to a third party. Design: Qualitative descriptive design using focus group methodology. Sample: A sample was drawn from RNs who resigned from 2 major employers between January 1999 and December 1999 and who were eligible for rehire. A sample of 7 RNs participated in focus groups (mean age 44 years). Procedure: 80 invitations to participate in the focus groups examining nurse turnover were mailed to nurses meeting the study criteria with a follow-up postcard mailed 3 weeks later. A phone call was made to nurses agreeing to participate, clarifying the purpose of the study and to give directions for the focus group. Focus groups were held on a University Campus with one facilitator asking 6 open-ended questions. Data was collected using 2 voice activated recorders, and then was transcribed verbatim. Researchers reviewed the transcriptions for themes, categories, and repeating patterns independently and then together. Results: Respondents reported that they left their positions due to ineffective management practices, support, and failure to listen to concerns, short staffing, and little or no effort at nurse retention by employers. They reported attempting to change the work environment prior to leaving and when that did not &rdquo;work&rdquo; left the setting. The reasons they told their employers they were leaving were diverse. Conclusions: The reasons nurses leave employment is diverse, related to management practice, short staffing, and sense of lack of appreciation for doing important work. Implications: Retention efforts need to focus on issues important to the nurses. A new vision of teamwork for the nursing staff is necessary.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:00:40Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:00:40Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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