Leaders are made not born: Assessment and development of BSN students’ leadership ability

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149352
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Leaders are made not born: Assessment and development of BSN students’ leadership ability
Abstract:
Leaders are made not born: Assessment and development of BSN students’ leadership ability
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Grossman, Sheila, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Fairfield University
Title:Assistant Professor
Introduction – Nursing students can be taught how to develop their leadership capacity by learning and applying leadership theory to real-life situations and practicing leadership. It is paramount for the profession that the acquisition of leadership skills becomes as much a part of outcome measurement as NCLEX scores are. Purpose – The purpose of this study was to pilot a tool to measure senior nursing students’ perceived definition of leadership and perception of their own leadership ability. Design – This quasi-experimental study was conducted with senior year second degree and generic nursing students. A pre-post test design was used. The intervention was participating in a Nursing Leadership and Management course offered over a semester for generics and in a turbo summer session for second-degree students. Sample/Setting – The sample consisted of 70 BSN volunteer nursing students [42 were generics and 28 were second degree students] in their senior year at a northeastern university. Demographic data included a female majority, ages that ranged from 20 to 44, GPAs that ranged from 2.1-3.9, and an average SAT score of 1150. Most of the second-degree students had volunteer or community service whereas 33% if the generics were involved in their communities. All five human rights were maintained for subject protection in this study. Variables – Two dependent variables, perceived definition of leadership and perceived leadership ability of self, were measured. The tool was developed after a concept analysis of the following themes was conducted: creativity, adaptability, risk-taking, vision building, conflict management, credibility, and empowerment. Instrument – The two part Leadership Characteristics and Skills Assessment Tool generated a Cronbach Alpha of .88 and received content validity from four nursing experts in leadership. Findings – A statistically significant difference was found between pre and posttest results of the generic students (p< .05, t = 1.811) using a t-test. Improved but not significant findings were determined for second-degree students using pre and posttest scores (p>.05, t= 1.235). Demographics for the two groups of seniors yielded statistically significant differences so results are being interpreted separately for each group. Conclusions – The majority of generic seniors had inaccurate perceptions of what a leader represents during pre-testing and they also perceived themselves as having low leadership ability. Having current experience in volunteer, religious, or other community service identified higher scoring students in both Part I and Part II. Post-testing demonstrated significant increases in both parts of the test. Second-degree students who had job experience tended to have scores that differed less than those who did not have recent work experience. By using the Leadership Characteristics and Skills Assessment Tool student perceptions of what makes a good leader and their own perceived ability to lead were measured. Theoretical and experiential learning in leadership influenced students’ perception of what a leader symbolizes and also increased their perceived ability to lead. If nursing students feel they are measuring up to their perception of what a leader is (and this perception is accurate) the nursing profession should benefit greatly. Implications –This tool needs to be used with more generic senior nursing students in order to increase its reliability. More qualitative study is needed regarding students’ perceptions of their volunteer activities and community service and how this impacts leadership. Longitudinal studies should be conducted to determine what nursing education experiences most facilitate leadership growth. Consequently nursing curricula need to be revised to provide more leadership opportunities earlier in the program and leadership needs to be integrated throughout the curricula.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleLeaders are made not born: Assessment and development of BSN students’ leadership abilityen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149352-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Leaders are made not born: Assessment and development of BSN students&rsquo; leadership ability</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Grossman, Sheila, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Fairfield University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">sheilacg@aol.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Introduction &ndash; Nursing students can be taught how to develop their leadership capacity by learning and applying leadership theory to real-life situations and practicing leadership. It is paramount for the profession that the acquisition of leadership skills becomes as much a part of outcome measurement as NCLEX scores are. Purpose &ndash; The purpose of this study was to pilot a tool to measure senior nursing students&rsquo; perceived definition of leadership and perception of their own leadership ability. Design &ndash; This quasi-experimental study was conducted with senior year second degree and generic nursing students. A pre-post test design was used. The intervention was participating in a Nursing Leadership and Management course offered over a semester for generics and in a turbo summer session for second-degree students. Sample/Setting &ndash; The sample consisted of 70 BSN volunteer nursing students [42 were generics and 28 were second degree students] in their senior year at a northeastern university. Demographic data included a female majority, ages that ranged from 20 to 44, GPAs that ranged from 2.1-3.9, and an average SAT score of 1150. Most of the second-degree students had volunteer or community service whereas 33% if the generics were involved in their communities. All five human rights were maintained for subject protection in this study. Variables &ndash; Two dependent variables, perceived definition of leadership and perceived leadership ability of self, were measured. The tool was developed after a concept analysis of the following themes was conducted: creativity, adaptability, risk-taking, vision building, conflict management, credibility, and empowerment. Instrument &ndash; The two part Leadership Characteristics and Skills Assessment Tool generated a Cronbach Alpha of .88 and received content validity from four nursing experts in leadership. Findings &ndash; A statistically significant difference was found between pre and posttest results of the generic students (p&lt; .05, t = 1.811) using a t-test. Improved but not significant findings were determined for second-degree students using pre and posttest scores (p&gt;.05, t= 1.235). Demographics for the two groups of seniors yielded statistically significant differences so results are being interpreted separately for each group. Conclusions &ndash; The majority of generic seniors had inaccurate perceptions of what a leader represents during pre-testing and they also perceived themselves as having low leadership ability. Having current experience in volunteer, religious, or other community service identified higher scoring students in both Part I and Part II. Post-testing demonstrated significant increases in both parts of the test. Second-degree students who had job experience tended to have scores that differed less than those who did not have recent work experience. By using the Leadership Characteristics and Skills Assessment Tool student perceptions of what makes a good leader and their own perceived ability to lead were measured. Theoretical and experiential learning in leadership influenced students&rsquo; perception of what a leader symbolizes and also increased their perceived ability to lead. If nursing students feel they are measuring up to their perception of what a leader is (and this perception is accurate) the nursing profession should benefit greatly. Implications &ndash;This tool needs to be used with more generic senior nursing students in order to increase its reliability. More qualitative study is needed regarding students&rsquo; perceptions of their volunteer activities and community service and how this impacts leadership. Longitudinal studies should be conducted to determine what nursing education experiences most facilitate leadership growth. Consequently nursing curricula need to be revised to provide more leadership opportunities earlier in the program and leadership needs to be integrated throughout the curricula.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:00:42Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:00:42Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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