Comparison of Faculty and Student Perceptions of Student Workload in a Baccalaureate Nursing Program

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149355
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Comparison of Faculty and Student Perceptions of Student Workload in a Baccalaureate Nursing Program
Abstract:
Comparison of Faculty and Student Perceptions of Student Workload in a Baccalaureate Nursing Program
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Wisnewski, Charlotte, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Texas Medical Branch
Title:Assistant Professor
Objective: The purpose of this descriptive study was to compare the perceptions between faculty and students about time spent on preparation for testing and assignments in baccalaureate nursing courses. Design: It is a non-experimental descriptive study of the current state of the curriculum. Sample: A convenience sample of 165 nursing students and 35 faculty participated in the study. Setting: The BSN program is an upper division program located in a large health science center in the southwestern United States. Names of Variables or Concepts: The concept under study was the degree to which there was congruence between faculty and student in the amount of preparation time needed for course work. Measures/Instruments: Questionnaires were developed to obtain demographic data from participants. Data from students included time spent working, marital status, and number of children. Demographic data from faculty included faculty rank, education, terminal degree and number of years teaching. Both groups estimated time spent by students in preparing for class including project-specific data for each course. Effect sizes were calculated for differences in perception of time spent in exam preparation and assignment completion within each course. Findings: Within courses, students had wide variability among themselves as to time spent in course preparation. Faculty also varied widely within courses. Between faculty and students there was also wide variability with faculty often underestimating student time. Conclusions: Different perceptions in course workload exist between students and faculty. However, some faculty estimate course time more in congruence with students estimates than other faculty. Factors influencing these estimations were examined. Implications: A better understanding of the time students spend meeting course requirements could help nursing educators formulate realistic course assignments for the time and credit hours involved.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleComparison of Faculty and Student Perceptions of Student Workload in a Baccalaureate Nursing Programen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149355-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Comparison of Faculty and Student Perceptions of Student Workload in a Baccalaureate Nursing Program</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Wisnewski, Charlotte, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Texas Medical Branch</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cwisnews@utmb.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: The purpose of this descriptive study was to compare the perceptions between faculty and students about time spent on preparation for testing and assignments in baccalaureate nursing courses. Design: It is a non-experimental descriptive study of the current state of the curriculum. Sample: A convenience sample of 165 nursing students and 35 faculty participated in the study. Setting: The BSN program is an upper division program located in a large health science center in the southwestern United States. Names of Variables or Concepts: The concept under study was the degree to which there was congruence between faculty and student in the amount of preparation time needed for course work. Measures/Instruments: Questionnaires were developed to obtain demographic data from participants. Data from students included time spent working, marital status, and number of children. Demographic data from faculty included faculty rank, education, terminal degree and number of years teaching. Both groups estimated time spent by students in preparing for class including project-specific data for each course. Effect sizes were calculated for differences in perception of time spent in exam preparation and assignment completion within each course. Findings: Within courses, students had wide variability among themselves as to time spent in course preparation. Faculty also varied widely within courses. Between faculty and students there was also wide variability with faculty often underestimating student time. Conclusions: Different perceptions in course workload exist between students and faculty. However, some faculty estimate course time more in congruence with students estimates than other faculty. Factors influencing these estimations were examined. Implications: A better understanding of the time students spend meeting course requirements could help nursing educators formulate realistic course assignments for the time and credit hours involved.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:00:46Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:00:46Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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