Effects of daily activities on ambulatory blood pressure during menstrual cycle in normotensive women

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149356
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effects of daily activities on ambulatory blood pressure during menstrual cycle in normotensive women
Abstract:
Effects of daily activities on ambulatory blood pressure during menstrual cycle in normotensive women
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Yucha, Carolyn, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Florida
Title:Associate Professor
Objective: The purpose of this study was to (1) determine the effect of menstrual cycle phase on blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR), and (2) examine the relation between daily activities and moods and concurrent ambulatory BP during the normal menstrual cycle. Design: Cross-sectional and correlational design. Sample: Twelve normotensive women, aged between 28 and 50, with a normal menstrual cycle were included in this study. Setting Community. Variables: Daytime and nighttime average BP and HR measures and standard deviations were calculated. Nocturnal drop in BP and HR were calculated by subtracting daytime measures from nighttime measures. Daily activity variables included posture and physical effort. Measurements of moods comprised of annoyance, tenseness, and happiness. Measures/Instruments: BP was measured at 30- to 60-minute intervals during a 24-hour period using an ambulatory BP monitor (Model 90207, SpaceLabs Medical, Inc., Redmond, WA) on days 1, 8, 15, and 22 of the menstrual cycle, representing the commencement of menstruation, follicular, ovulation, and luteal phase, respectively. Subjects were asked to report their posture, physical effort, and mood (“annoyed," “tense," and “happy”) on 5-point Likert-type scales each time the ambulatory BP monitor took measurements. Findings: Systolic BP was lower on day 8 of the cycle. HR was lower on days 1 and 8. Daytime systolic BP was affected by posture, not by moods, whereas daytime diastolic BP was affected by posture and levels of tenseness. The level of physical effort only affected HR, not BP. The average daytime physical and emotional variables had little influence over the average daytime BP. Conclusions: Systolic BP was lower during the follicular phase in normotensive women with a normal menstrual cycle even after the consideration of other factors. Physical activity or moods had only momentary effects on BP or HR. Implications: The cross-validation statistical method used in this study is suggested for future studies on cardiovascular variables. Using this method, the inclusion of menstrual phase in the model improved the prediction of SBP for five out of the twelve women studied.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEffects of daily activities on ambulatory blood pressure during menstrual cycle in normotensive womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149356-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Effects of daily activities on ambulatory blood pressure during menstrual cycle in normotensive women</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Yucha, Carolyn, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Florida</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">yuchacb@nursing.ufl.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: The purpose of this study was to (1) determine the effect of menstrual cycle phase on blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR), and (2) examine the relation between daily activities and moods and concurrent ambulatory BP during the normal menstrual cycle. Design: Cross-sectional and correlational design. Sample: Twelve normotensive women, aged between 28 and 50, with a normal menstrual cycle were included in this study. Setting Community. Variables: Daytime and nighttime average BP and HR measures and standard deviations were calculated. Nocturnal drop in BP and HR were calculated by subtracting daytime measures from nighttime measures. Daily activity variables included posture and physical effort. Measurements of moods comprised of annoyance, tenseness, and happiness. Measures/Instruments: BP was measured at 30- to 60-minute intervals during a 24-hour period using an ambulatory BP monitor (Model 90207, SpaceLabs Medical, Inc., Redmond, WA) on days 1, 8, 15, and 22 of the menstrual cycle, representing the commencement of menstruation, follicular, ovulation, and luteal phase, respectively. Subjects were asked to report their posture, physical effort, and mood (&ldquo;annoyed,&quot; &ldquo;tense,&quot; and &ldquo;happy&rdquo;) on 5-point Likert-type scales each time the ambulatory BP monitor took measurements. Findings: Systolic BP was lower on day 8 of the cycle. HR was lower on days 1 and 8. Daytime systolic BP was affected by posture, not by moods, whereas daytime diastolic BP was affected by posture and levels of tenseness. The level of physical effort only affected HR, not BP. The average daytime physical and emotional variables had little influence over the average daytime BP. Conclusions: Systolic BP was lower during the follicular phase in normotensive women with a normal menstrual cycle even after the consideration of other factors. Physical activity or moods had only momentary effects on BP or HR. Implications: The cross-validation statistical method used in this study is suggested for future studies on cardiovascular variables. Using this method, the inclusion of menstrual phase in the model improved the prediction of SBP for five out of the twelve women studied.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:00:47Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:00:47Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.