What Forever Means: Elder Women’s Experience with Death of a Wished-For Baby

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149358
Type:
Presentation
Title:
What Forever Means: Elder Women’s Experience with Death of a Wished-For Baby
Abstract:
What Forever Means: Elder Women’s Experience with Death of a Wished-For Baby
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Lauterbach, Sarah
P.I. Institution Name:Florida State University
Objective: The purpose of this inquiry is to explore meanings in elder women’s experience with death of a wished-for baby over time. Design: The Inquiry uses a qualitative design, a retrospective phenomenological perspective to examine and describe elder women’s experience with perinatal death many years earlier. Max van Manen and Munhall’s method of phenomenological inquiry is being used. The investigation will include investigating the phenomenon in cemetery, memorial art, creative art and literature. Setting: Interviews are planned and currently in progress. Taking place in elder women‘s residences, including their homes and nursing homes, these settings provide a safe and confidential environment for a lengthy and full discussion of the experience. Names of Variables or Concept: the concept of perinatal infant death, bereavement, mourning, and perinatal loss are terms used to identify the phenomenon. Elder women have described the phenomenon of perinatal infant death as having “lost a baby”. Measurements/Instruments: Two to three audio taped and transcribed interviews and guided conversations are planned with each participant. The interview data will be transcribed and subjected to thematic analysis. Findings will be validated in follow-up interviews. Data analysis is an ongoing process running concurrently with data collection. Findings: Data collection and analysis reveals preliminary descriptions of elder women’s experience very similar descriptions of participant mothers in the researcher’s earlier doctoral research. Using the same methodological perspective of the doctoral research, the current inquiry is discovering that elder mothers’ experience of having a baby die is similar to mothers’ descriptions earlier. For elder women experiencing the death of a baby is an existential experience of Being-a-mother in another world, which has continued over many years. Each elder mother has expressed an anticipation of, in the words of the participant, “seeing my baby again soon”. Elder mothers are describing many years of suffering in silence with very few people willing to talk with them about their babies. As women age even fewer people who knew them or saw their babies, are still alive. Conclusions: Preliminary data analysis of interview data seems to validate findings from the earlier research. The need to extend supportive care to mothers over time when perinatal death occurs is being articulated. Thoughtful informed longitudinal care hopefully facilitates understanding and support to mothers in dealing with the death of a baby over time. Further, in elder years, revisiting the experience seems to have therapeutic outcomes. The balancing of the research and therapeutic imperatives and the emergence of a caring imperative, articulated in the earlier writings of the researcher, is occurring in the current inquiry.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWhat Forever Means: Elder Women’s Experience with Death of a Wished-For Babyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149358-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">What Forever Means: Elder Women&rsquo;s Experience with Death of a Wished-For Baby</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lauterbach, Sarah</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Florida State University</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">slauterb@mailer.fsu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: The purpose of this inquiry is to explore meanings in elder women&rsquo;s experience with death of a wished-for baby over time. Design: The Inquiry uses a qualitative design, a retrospective phenomenological perspective to examine and describe elder women&rsquo;s experience with perinatal death many years earlier. Max van Manen and Munhall&rsquo;s method of phenomenological inquiry is being used. The investigation will include investigating the phenomenon in cemetery, memorial art, creative art and literature. Setting: Interviews are planned and currently in progress. Taking place in elder women&lsquo;s residences, including their homes and nursing homes, these settings provide a safe and confidential environment for a lengthy and full discussion of the experience. Names of Variables or Concept: the concept of perinatal infant death, bereavement, mourning, and perinatal loss are terms used to identify the phenomenon. Elder women have described the phenomenon of perinatal infant death as having &ldquo;lost a baby&rdquo;. Measurements/Instruments: Two to three audio taped and transcribed interviews and guided conversations are planned with each participant. The interview data will be transcribed and subjected to thematic analysis. Findings will be validated in follow-up interviews. Data analysis is an ongoing process running concurrently with data collection. Findings: Data collection and analysis reveals preliminary descriptions of elder women&rsquo;s experience very similar descriptions of participant mothers in the researcher&rsquo;s earlier doctoral research. Using the same methodological perspective of the doctoral research, the current inquiry is discovering that elder mothers&rsquo; experience of having a baby die is similar to mothers&rsquo; descriptions earlier. For elder women experiencing the death of a baby is an existential experience of Being-a-mother in another world, which has continued over many years. Each elder mother has expressed an anticipation of, in the words of the participant, &ldquo;seeing my baby again soon&rdquo;. Elder mothers are describing many years of suffering in silence with very few people willing to talk with them about their babies. As women age even fewer people who knew them or saw their babies, are still alive. Conclusions: Preliminary data analysis of interview data seems to validate findings from the earlier research. The need to extend supportive care to mothers over time when perinatal death occurs is being articulated. Thoughtful informed longitudinal care hopefully facilitates understanding and support to mothers in dealing with the death of a baby over time. Further, in elder years, revisiting the experience seems to have therapeutic outcomes. The balancing of the research and therapeutic imperatives and the emergence of a caring imperative, articulated in the earlier writings of the researcher, is occurring in the current inquiry.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:00:49Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:00:49Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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