Navajo Children and Families Living with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome/Fetal Alcohol Effects

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149359
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Navajo Children and Families Living with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome/Fetal Alcohol Effects
Abstract:
Navajo Children and Families Living with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome/Fetal Alcohol Effects
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Beckett, Cynthia
P.I. Institution Name:Northern Arizona University
Objective: The aim of the study is to develop a culturally sensitive Grounded Theory of resilience in Navajo children and families who are living with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS)/Fetal Alcohol Effects (FAE). The research question is: What are the social and cultural factors and processes that Navajo families and community use to facilitate resilience to manage care for a child with FAS/FAE? Design: Grounded Theory was chosen for this study with Native Americans because of its fit to the culture. Navajo is a culture of story telling and cultural rituals/ceremonies. When exploring this culture, the traditional beliefs, practices, and values appear to be linked to social processes. Through the Grounded Theory method, identification and understanding of the processes that are used in parenting and caring for a child with FAS/FAE are being explored. Sample: The informants are comprised of a theoretical sample of 10-30 Navajo families who are managing a child/(children) with FAS/FAE. Inclusion criteria for the sample include: 1) Navajo (registered as a Navajo), at least one primary caregiver and the child (caregivers may be extended or clan family); 2) school-age child with FAS/FAE (age 5-12); and 3) primary parent/caregiver and family member(s), (nuclear, extended, and/or clan), that were identified as being involved in parenting/child rearing. This may include siblings if they are involved in the child rearing roles. Setting: Northern Arizona and the Navajo Nation. Names of Variables or Concept: The philosophical perspectives that are guiding the study are the Navajo Philosophy, or view of life; Resilience (middle range theory); the Family Stress Theory; and the Resiliency Model of Family Stress, Adjustment, and Adaptation. Resilience is being used as the conceptual framework for the study of Navajo families managing children with FAS/FAE. Measurements/Instruments: No measurements/instruments were used. Findings: The research is ongoing. Preliminary findings have identified three main themes 1) harmony and balance: spiritual-mental-physical; 2) intergenerational integration of knowledge, beliefs, and practices; 3) kinship – connectedness to the clan. Navajo parenting works to achieve harmony and balance by integration of culture (through influences of intergenerational knowledge, practice, and beliefs), and through integration of kinship (clan connectedness). Conclusions: Saturation has not occurred; therefore, the research is ongoing to identify other themes, categories and dimensions to further define the theory. The Resiliency Model of Family Stress, Adjustment, and Adaptation will be used as a framework to critique the congruency of the concepts of resilience with the completed Grounded Theory of Navajo parenting. Implications: Understanding the factors and processes involved in raising a child/children with FAS/FAE will enhance the identification of patterns of resilience in parenting for Navajo families. The challenges that are involved in the primary and secondary conditions related to FAS/FAE may be more easily managed with effective resilience within the family. Identification of factors that influence resilience in parenting will provide foundational information for healthcare providers to be used when assisting other Navajo families who are managing the problems associated with FAS/FAE. This knowledge may also improve the effectiveness of referrals for health and educational needs for the child and family.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNavajo Children and Families Living with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome/Fetal Alcohol Effectsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149359-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Navajo Children and Families Living with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome/Fetal Alcohol Effects</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Beckett, Cynthia</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Northern Arizona University</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cindy.beckett@nau.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: The aim of the study is to develop a culturally sensitive Grounded Theory of resilience in Navajo children and families who are living with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS)/Fetal Alcohol Effects (FAE). The research question is: What are the social and cultural factors and processes that Navajo families and community use to facilitate resilience to manage care for a child with FAS/FAE? Design: Grounded Theory was chosen for this study with Native Americans because of its fit to the culture. Navajo is a culture of story telling and cultural rituals/ceremonies. When exploring this culture, the traditional beliefs, practices, and values appear to be linked to social processes. Through the Grounded Theory method, identification and understanding of the processes that are used in parenting and caring for a child with FAS/FAE are being explored. Sample: The informants are comprised of a theoretical sample of 10-30 Navajo families who are managing a child/(children) with FAS/FAE. Inclusion criteria for the sample include: 1) Navajo (registered as a Navajo), at least one primary caregiver and the child (caregivers may be extended or clan family); 2) school-age child with FAS/FAE (age 5-12); and 3) primary parent/caregiver and family member(s), (nuclear, extended, and/or clan), that were identified as being involved in parenting/child rearing. This may include siblings if they are involved in the child rearing roles. Setting: Northern Arizona and the Navajo Nation. Names of Variables or Concept: The philosophical perspectives that are guiding the study are the Navajo Philosophy, or view of life; Resilience (middle range theory); the Family Stress Theory; and the Resiliency Model of Family Stress, Adjustment, and Adaptation. Resilience is being used as the conceptual framework for the study of Navajo families managing children with FAS/FAE. Measurements/Instruments: No measurements/instruments were used. Findings: The research is ongoing. Preliminary findings have identified three main themes 1) harmony and balance: spiritual-mental-physical; 2) intergenerational integration of knowledge, beliefs, and practices; 3) kinship &ndash; connectedness to the clan. Navajo parenting works to achieve harmony and balance by integration of culture (through influences of intergenerational knowledge, practice, and beliefs), and through integration of kinship (clan connectedness). Conclusions: Saturation has not occurred; therefore, the research is ongoing to identify other themes, categories and dimensions to further define the theory. The Resiliency Model of Family Stress, Adjustment, and Adaptation will be used as a framework to critique the congruency of the concepts of resilience with the completed Grounded Theory of Navajo parenting. Implications: Understanding the factors and processes involved in raising a child/children with FAS/FAE will enhance the identification of patterns of resilience in parenting for Navajo families. The challenges that are involved in the primary and secondary conditions related to FAS/FAE may be more easily managed with effective resilience within the family. Identification of factors that influence resilience in parenting will provide foundational information for healthcare providers to be used when assisting other Navajo families who are managing the problems associated with FAS/FAE. This knowledge may also improve the effectiveness of referrals for health and educational needs for the child and family.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:00:50Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:00:50Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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