The Effects on the Family of Cochlear Implants in their Hearing Impaired Child

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149360
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Effects on the Family of Cochlear Implants in their Hearing Impaired Child
Abstract:
The Effects on the Family of Cochlear Implants in their Hearing Impaired Child
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Allegretti, Christina
P.I. Institution Name:University of Alabama
A relatively new procedure, cochlear implantation, has taken off in the past several years. The implant converts sound into electrical signals, which then stimulates the nerve ending, in order for the recipient to hear. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects on the family, both positive and negative, of cochlear implants in their hearing impaired child. The data collection for this case study (including mother, father and one child) included systematic organization as a unit. The data analysis then focused on the data as a whole. Research questions answered include concepts of familial adaptation, concerns throughout the implantation process, desired outcomes, and specific benefits received by the family. Three interviews and one checklist evaluated family members before, during and after implantation. The development of the behavioral checklist for the recipient assessed the changes before the implant and after programming of the device. Each interview, lasting thirty minutes, took place on an individual basis. The interviews and checklists were conducted either via phone or at a clinic near an urban university. The findings reflect several common themes, such as, ambivalence, excitement, fear, anxiety, impatience, and nervousness. Support for this study granted by Nu Chapter, Sigma Theta Tau.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Effects on the Family of Cochlear Implants in their Hearing Impaired Childen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149360-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Effects on the Family of Cochlear Implants in their Hearing Impaired Child</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Allegretti, Christina</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Alabama</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">allegrec@son.uab.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">A relatively new procedure, cochlear implantation, has taken off in the past several years. The implant converts sound into electrical signals, which then stimulates the nerve ending, in order for the recipient to hear. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects on the family, both positive and negative, of cochlear implants in their hearing impaired child. The data collection for this case study (including mother, father and one child) included systematic organization as a unit. The data analysis then focused on the data as a whole. Research questions answered include concepts of familial adaptation, concerns throughout the implantation process, desired outcomes, and specific benefits received by the family. Three interviews and one checklist evaluated family members before, during and after implantation. The development of the behavioral checklist for the recipient assessed the changes before the implant and after programming of the device. Each interview, lasting thirty minutes, took place on an individual basis. The interviews and checklists were conducted either via phone or at a clinic near an urban university. The findings reflect several common themes, such as, ambivalence, excitement, fear, anxiety, impatience, and nervousness. Support for this study granted by Nu Chapter, Sigma Theta Tau.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:00:52Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:00:52Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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