Autonomic patterns in premenstrual syndrome: A preliminary study

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149363
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Autonomic patterns in premenstrual syndrome: A preliminary study
Abstract:
Autonomic patterns in premenstrual syndrome: A preliminary study
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Hertig, Vicky
P.I. Institution Name:University of Washington
Background and Design: The premenstrual syndrome (PMS) is commonly understood to involve psychobiologic turmoil in the late luteal phase of the menstrual cycle. In a classic paper, Sato, et al., (Psychosomatic Medicine 57:331-335, 1995) showed that brief laboratory measures of heart rate variability (HRV) were useful in describing adaptations of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) throughout the menstrual cycle in 20 normal young women. In particular, they found that HRV-based measures of parasympathetic ANS activity were significantly reduced in the luteal phase. In a small instrument feasibility pilot study, we sought to determine if HRV summary measures (SD, RMSSD, %RR50, SDRatio, Spectral HF, Spectral LF/HF Ratio) based on 24 hour ambulatory Holter ECG recordings could distinguish ANS patterns at different phases of the menstrual cycle in a carefully screened convenience sample of premenstrual high symptom (PMS, N=5) and normal, low symptom (LS, N=7) women. The small-N preliminary study design was a two-group (across-subject: PMS vs. LS), two-phase (within-subject repeated measures: follicular and luteal phases) protocol. We expected both groups to have lower HRV-based parasympathetic indices in the luteal phase than in the follicular phase; and we expected that the PMS women would be particularly low on these measures in the luteal phase, when their symptoms were peaking. Results: The results of this pilot study were not completely in accord with our hypotheses. Within the subgroup of LS women there was a statistically significant decrease (p=0.018) in HRV vagal activity indices from the follicular to the luteal phase, consistent with the earlier work of Sato, et al. However, no such pattern could be detected in the PMS group. In fact, the parasympathetic indices went slightly up at the luteal phase for the symptomatic group. The PMS group generally had lower vagal HRV indices than the LS group, but the effect is most marked during the follicular phase (p=0.008), not in the hypothesized luteal phase. There was a strong statistically significant group by phase interaction (p=0.015), wherein the LS women experienced a large drop in nocturnal vagal tone from the follicular to the luteal phase, while the PMS women began with a considerably lower level of vagal tone in the follicular phase and increased slightly in the luteal phase. Conclusions: Ambulatory 24 hour Holter HRV studies appear to have value in describing ANS patterns across the menstrual cycle. Although the results of this preliminary study (N=12) should be interpreted cautiously, it is of considerable interest that the largest differences between the PMS and the LS groups were during the supposedly asymptomatic follicular phase, and during the nocturnal hours. The PMS experience may have ramifications that extend beyond the late luteal throughout the menstrual cycle.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAutonomic patterns in premenstrual syndrome: A preliminary studyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149363-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Autonomic patterns in premenstrual syndrome: A preliminary study</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hertig, Vicky</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Washington</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">vhertig@u.washington.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background and Design: The premenstrual syndrome (PMS) is commonly understood to involve psychobiologic turmoil in the late luteal phase of the menstrual cycle. In a classic paper, Sato, et al., (Psychosomatic Medicine 57:331-335, 1995) showed that brief laboratory measures of heart rate variability (HRV) were useful in describing adaptations of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) throughout the menstrual cycle in 20 normal young women. In particular, they found that HRV-based measures of parasympathetic ANS activity were significantly reduced in the luteal phase. In a small instrument feasibility pilot study, we sought to determine if HRV summary measures (SD, RMSSD, %RR50, SDRatio, Spectral HF, Spectral LF/HF Ratio) based on 24 hour ambulatory Holter ECG recordings could distinguish ANS patterns at different phases of the menstrual cycle in a carefully screened convenience sample of premenstrual high symptom (PMS, N=5) and normal, low symptom (LS, N=7) women. The small-N preliminary study design was a two-group (across-subject: PMS vs. LS), two-phase (within-subject repeated measures: follicular and luteal phases) protocol. We expected both groups to have lower HRV-based parasympathetic indices in the luteal phase than in the follicular phase; and we expected that the PMS women would be particularly low on these measures in the luteal phase, when their symptoms were peaking. Results: The results of this pilot study were not completely in accord with our hypotheses. Within the subgroup of LS women there was a statistically significant decrease (p=0.018) in HRV vagal activity indices from the follicular to the luteal phase, consistent with the earlier work of Sato, et al. However, no such pattern could be detected in the PMS group. In fact, the parasympathetic indices went slightly up at the luteal phase for the symptomatic group. The PMS group generally had lower vagal HRV indices than the LS group, but the effect is most marked during the follicular phase (p=0.008), not in the hypothesized luteal phase. There was a strong statistically significant group by phase interaction (p=0.015), wherein the LS women experienced a large drop in nocturnal vagal tone from the follicular to the luteal phase, while the PMS women began with a considerably lower level of vagal tone in the follicular phase and increased slightly in the luteal phase. Conclusions: Ambulatory 24 hour Holter HRV studies appear to have value in describing ANS patterns across the menstrual cycle. Although the results of this preliminary study (N=12) should be interpreted cautiously, it is of considerable interest that the largest differences between the PMS and the LS groups were during the supposedly asymptomatic follicular phase, and during the nocturnal hours. The PMS experience may have ramifications that extend beyond the late luteal throughout the menstrual cycle.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:00:55Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:00:55Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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