The Influence of Antenatal Diagnosis of Congenital Heart Disease on Prospective Parents

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149369
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Influence of Antenatal Diagnosis of Congenital Heart Disease on Prospective Parents
Abstract:
The Influence of Antenatal Diagnosis of Congenital Heart Disease on Prospective Parents
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Rempel, G.
P.I. Institution Name:University of Alberta
Although antenatal diagnosis of congenital heart disease (CHD) has been available since the 1980s, formalized Fetal Cardiology Centres are a more recent phenomenon. Within our multidisciplinary Fetal Cardiology Service, we conduct 400–450 fetal echocardiograms annually with 60–80 positive diagnoses. While continually advancing the technological aspects of antenatal diagnosis of CHD, we are committed to ongoing research to understand the experiences of women and their partners who receive antenatal services. Grief and uncertainty characterizes a couple’s experience of finding out about their developing fetus’ congenital heart disease (CHD) and presents immense challenges for women and their partners, as well as for the health care professionals involved. This qualitative study, employing in-depth interviews with 19 women and their partners at three different occasions in their experience of antenatal diagnosis of CHD, both during and after the pregnancy, focused on how prospective parents manage their experience of their baby’s antenatal diagnosis of CHD. One of the main influences of the antenatal diagnosis on the prospective parents, revealed through constant comparative analysis of data, was the agonizing nature of their subsequent decision-making concerning further diagnostic testing and, in many cases, the option of pregnancy termination. Participants described the difficulties of making such crucial decisions in the time-pressured context of a progressing pregnancy while at the same time grieving the loss of their anticipated “perfect” baby. Some participants expressed feeling vulnerable in relation to the influence that health care providers had on their decision-making. Some felt that the professionals were too directive, especially related to termination. Their insistence that health care professionals explore the beliefs and values of those they are counseling regarding the antenatal diagnosis of CHD warrants ongoing discussion amongst nurses. As the advanced practice role of nurses expands to include nurse practitioners as well as clinical nurse specialists in pediatric cardiology, increasing cognizance and articulation of the influence of our roles with parents during their antenatal decision-making is necessary and timely both ethically and professionally.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Influence of Antenatal Diagnosis of Congenital Heart Disease on Prospective Parentsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149369-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Influence of Antenatal Diagnosis of Congenital Heart Disease on Prospective Parents</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Rempel, G.</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Alberta</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">grrempel@ualberta.ca</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Although antenatal diagnosis of congenital heart disease (CHD) has been available since the 1980s, formalized Fetal Cardiology Centres are a more recent phenomenon. Within our multidisciplinary Fetal Cardiology Service, we conduct 400&ndash;450 fetal echocardiograms annually with 60&ndash;80 positive diagnoses. While continually advancing the technological aspects of antenatal diagnosis of CHD, we are committed to ongoing research to understand the experiences of women and their partners who receive antenatal services. Grief and uncertainty characterizes a couple&rsquo;s experience of finding out about their developing fetus&rsquo; congenital heart disease (CHD) and presents immense challenges for women and their partners, as well as for the health care professionals involved. This qualitative study, employing in-depth interviews with 19 women and their partners at three different occasions in their experience of antenatal diagnosis of CHD, both during and after the pregnancy, focused on how prospective parents manage their experience of their baby&rsquo;s antenatal diagnosis of CHD. One of the main influences of the antenatal diagnosis on the prospective parents, revealed through constant comparative analysis of data, was the agonizing nature of their subsequent decision-making concerning further diagnostic testing and, in many cases, the option of pregnancy termination. Participants described the difficulties of making such crucial decisions in the time-pressured context of a progressing pregnancy while at the same time grieving the loss of their anticipated &ldquo;perfect&rdquo; baby. Some participants expressed feeling vulnerable in relation to the influence that health care providers had on their decision-making. Some felt that the professionals were too directive, especially related to termination. Their insistence that health care professionals explore the beliefs and values of those they are counseling regarding the antenatal diagnosis of CHD warrants ongoing discussion amongst nurses. As the advanced practice role of nurses expands to include nurse practitioners as well as clinical nurse specialists in pediatric cardiology, increasing cognizance and articulation of the influence of our roles with parents during their antenatal decision-making is necessary and timely both ethically and professionally.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:01:03Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:01:03Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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