2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149370
Type:
Presentation
Title:
End of Life Comfort Care to Neonates
Abstract:
End of Life Comfort Care to Neonates
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Stringer, Marilyn, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Pennsylvania
Title:Assistant Professor
Providing end of life comfort care to fetus’ and neonates is often a difficult experience for care providers. Although this is not an unusual occurrence in obstetrics and neonatal nursing, our Level III nursery experienced a unique situation that prompted our staff to identify the need for such an evidence based practice guideline to focus on three key care issues including providing warmth, holding or cuddling and sedation. Currently, the literature is void of information addressing the care of dying neonates. Likewise, professional organizations have no resources focusing on the care of the neonate at the end of life. Therefore, we surveyed 10 benchmark health care facilities throughout the United States to establish if these facilities had end of life comfort care guidelines and to determine what their practice standards were concerning the provision of warmth, holding or cuddling and sedation. The survey results are as follows: 1) no facility had end of life comfort care guidelines (100%); 2) provision of warmth via a warm isolette (50%) or via hat and bundling in an open crib (50%); 3) holding infant until death (75%) or placing infant in a warm isolette until death (25%); 4) no provision of sedation to previable infants (100%); and 5) provision of sedation to the neonate being withdrawn from life support (100%). Next, based on the available practice evidence, our team representing nursing, medicine, social work, ethics, and pastoral care created end of life comfort care guidelines for the management of neonates who are either pre-viable or being withdrawn from life support.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEnd of Life Comfort Care to Neonatesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149370-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">End of Life Comfort Care to Neonates</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Stringer, Marilyn, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Pennsylvania</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">stringer@nursing.upenn.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Providing end of life comfort care to fetus&rsquo; and neonates is often a difficult experience for care providers. Although this is not an unusual occurrence in obstetrics and neonatal nursing, our Level III nursery experienced a unique situation that prompted our staff to identify the need for such an evidence based practice guideline to focus on three key care issues including providing warmth, holding or cuddling and sedation. Currently, the literature is void of information addressing the care of dying neonates. Likewise, professional organizations have no resources focusing on the care of the neonate at the end of life. Therefore, we surveyed 10 benchmark health care facilities throughout the United States to establish if these facilities had end of life comfort care guidelines and to determine what their practice standards were concerning the provision of warmth, holding or cuddling and sedation. The survey results are as follows: 1) no facility had end of life comfort care guidelines (100%); 2) provision of warmth via a warm isolette (50%) or via hat and bundling in an open crib (50%); 3) holding infant until death (75%) or placing infant in a warm isolette until death (25%); 4) no provision of sedation to previable infants (100%); and 5) provision of sedation to the neonate being withdrawn from life support (100%). Next, based on the available practice evidence, our team representing nursing, medicine, social work, ethics, and pastoral care created end of life comfort care guidelines for the management of neonates who are either pre-viable or being withdrawn from life support.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:01:04Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:01:04Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.