Using an Interdisciplinary System Approach to Reduce Blood Culture Contamination

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149376
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Using an Interdisciplinary System Approach to Reduce Blood Culture Contamination
Abstract:
Using an Interdisciplinary System Approach to Reduce Blood Culture Contamination
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Cuneen, Jane
P.I. Institution Name:Methodist Hospital, Clarian Health Partners of Indiana
Hospital redesign efforts, at a 750-bed tertiary care hospital, shifted responsibilities for blood culture specimen collection from the centralized phlebotomy team to nursing personnel. Blood culture contamination rates rose to 4.3% with some units reaching rates in excess of 12%. Proper specimen collection should result in a contamination rate of 2-3% (Strand, 1993). The Critical Care CNS convened an interdisciplinary team to develop blood culture collection procedure revisions reflecting published strategies to decrease contamination rates. Several factors influence the incidence of blood culture contamination such as the use of an antiseptic solution to cleanse the blood culture bottle prior to inoculation (Q-Probes, 1993). Specimens drawn from a vascular line are twice as frequently contaminated as venipuncture specimens (Bates, 1991). Use of 2% iodine tincture for skin disinfection decreased contamination rates to 3.74%, compared to a 6.25% rate with the use of povidine-iodine (Strand, 1993). Monthly data reports on unit-specific blood culture contamination rates were critical to the change process. Unit-based Clinical Practice Committees received their specific contamination rate data to help drive the methods used for implementation of the revised procedure. Through further data analysis, units with high rates effected changes based on their circumstance. Two critical care units discovered 50% of their contaminants were from line draws, and increased their emphasis on avoiding line draws per procedure. Other units revised education strategies once they noted like units had lower rates. Blood culture contamination rates at the hospital steadily decreased and are consistently within the national benchmark of 2-3%. In the first year of implementation, nurses achieved 296 fewer sets of contaminated blood cultures. Based on financial estimates in the literature (Bates, 1991), savings of $1,361,600 were obtained with an estimated reduction in hospital days of 1,328. Satisfaction levels from administration, physicians, and nurses dramatically increased transcending a source of great discontent to one of pride.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUsing an Interdisciplinary System Approach to Reduce Blood Culture Contaminationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149376-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Using an Interdisciplinary System Approach to Reduce Blood Culture Contamination</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Cuneen, Jane</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Methodist Hospital, Clarian Health Partners of Indiana</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Hospital redesign efforts, at a 750-bed tertiary care hospital, shifted responsibilities for blood culture specimen collection from the centralized phlebotomy team to nursing personnel. Blood culture contamination rates rose to 4.3% with some units reaching rates in excess of 12%. Proper specimen collection should result in a contamination rate of 2-3% (Strand, 1993). The Critical Care CNS convened an interdisciplinary team to develop blood culture collection procedure revisions reflecting published strategies to decrease contamination rates. Several factors influence the incidence of blood culture contamination such as the use of an antiseptic solution to cleanse the blood culture bottle prior to inoculation (Q-Probes, 1993). Specimens drawn from a vascular line are twice as frequently contaminated as venipuncture specimens (Bates, 1991). Use of 2% iodine tincture for skin disinfection decreased contamination rates to 3.74%, compared to a 6.25% rate with the use of povidine-iodine (Strand, 1993). Monthly data reports on unit-specific blood culture contamination rates were critical to the change process. Unit-based Clinical Practice Committees received their specific contamination rate data to help drive the methods used for implementation of the revised procedure. Through further data analysis, units with high rates effected changes based on their circumstance. Two critical care units discovered 50% of their contaminants were from line draws, and increased their emphasis on avoiding line draws per procedure. Other units revised education strategies once they noted like units had lower rates. Blood culture contamination rates at the hospital steadily decreased and are consistently within the national benchmark of 2-3%. In the first year of implementation, nurses achieved 296 fewer sets of contaminated blood cultures. Based on financial estimates in the literature (Bates, 1991), savings of $1,361,600 were obtained with an estimated reduction in hospital days of 1,328. Satisfaction levels from administration, physicians, and nurses dramatically increased transcending a source of great discontent to one of pride.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:01:11Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:01:11Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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