2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/149379
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Service Learning and Affective Professional Socialization
Abstract:
Service Learning and Affective Professional Socialization
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2001
Conference Date:November 10 - 14, 2001
Author:Hodges, Helen, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Georgia Baptist College of Nursing of Mercer University
Title:Professor
For many soon-to-be nurses, pursuing nursing as a career is a calling, a personal mission, of giving and taking care of people. It is rare that nurses and students are not struck with the significance of birth and death experiences. But the mundane tasks of everyday practice can snuff out the passion of a caring practice. Professional development and socialization at the baccalaureate level is generally synthesized in a final course geared to the urgency of congealing professional traits, attitudes, attributes, and career management; clinical preparation typically includes time management and managing groups of patients. What are missing are unique opportunities of affective professional identification and ways to stay loving nursing. Service learning provides a unique vehicle to keeping the passion for nursing alive. Students are educated to enter a community environment with the idea of developing a partnership with people in the setting. “Together” they identify what services the students can provide that the community truly desires, and together they combine resources to solve problems. A hands-on approach without careplans, computers, calculators, critical time management issues, high tech equipment, and financial focus places the student in a role of community service at the most fundamental level. Service Learning experiences focus on community-based foot clinics for the elderly, the homeless, and the chronically mentally ill; community food banks; homeless shelters; international health clinics in underdeveloped countries, and various screening programs. Students work shoulder-to-shoulder with faculty mentors who love what they do and who are professionally engaged in the community. With traditional learning contexts left in the classroom, students are affectively open to collegial practices with faculty mentors, and to the affirming power of service for practicing RNs. Educators present a model of service learning and a convincing argument for including service learning in socializing soon-to-be nurses into the profession. Service learning is beyond the textbook. Ultimately it is less pedantic, generating a reflexive sense of relaxation and spiritual connection with individuals who need care and who are deeply appreciative of personal involvement. Touch, hugs, laughter, and small personal tokens of thanks are all acceptable, and make practice real and personally fulfilling. It is this reciprocal relationship that feeds the love of nursing practice. In the new millennium, attention to experiences that feed the soul will imbue students with affective skills essential to the survival of their spirit.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Nov-2001
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleService Learning and Affective Professional Socializationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/149379-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Service Learning and Affective Professional Socialization</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">November 10 - 14, 2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hodges, Helen, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Georgia Baptist College of Nursing of Mercer University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">hodges_hf@mercer.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">For many soon-to-be nurses, pursuing nursing as a career is a calling, a personal mission, of giving and taking care of people. It is rare that nurses and students are not struck with the significance of birth and death experiences. But the mundane tasks of everyday practice can snuff out the passion of a caring practice. Professional development and socialization at the baccalaureate level is generally synthesized in a final course geared to the urgency of congealing professional traits, attitudes, attributes, and career management; clinical preparation typically includes time management and managing groups of patients. What are missing are unique opportunities of affective professional identification and ways to stay loving nursing. Service learning provides a unique vehicle to keeping the passion for nursing alive. Students are educated to enter a community environment with the idea of developing a partnership with people in the setting. &ldquo;Together&rdquo; they identify what services the students can provide that the community truly desires, and together they combine resources to solve problems. A hands-on approach without careplans, computers, calculators, critical time management issues, high tech equipment, and financial focus places the student in a role of community service at the most fundamental level. Service Learning experiences focus on community-based foot clinics for the elderly, the homeless, and the chronically mentally ill; community food banks; homeless shelters; international health clinics in underdeveloped countries, and various screening programs. Students work shoulder-to-shoulder with faculty mentors who love what they do and who are professionally engaged in the community. With traditional learning contexts left in the classroom, students are affectively open to collegial practices with faculty mentors, and to the affirming power of service for practicing RNs. Educators present a model of service learning and a convincing argument for including service learning in socializing soon-to-be nurses into the profession. Service learning is beyond the textbook. Ultimately it is less pedantic, generating a reflexive sense of relaxation and spiritual connection with individuals who need care and who are deeply appreciative of personal involvement. Touch, hugs, laughter, and small personal tokens of thanks are all acceptable, and make practice real and personally fulfilling. It is this reciprocal relationship that feeds the love of nursing practice. In the new millennium, attention to experiences that feed the soul will imbue students with affective skills essential to the survival of their spirit.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T10:01:14Z-
dc.date.issued2001-11-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T10:01:14Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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